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I would like to be able to create a new instance of the ? parametrized type but I can't find a way to do it.

import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Set;


class Pinput {
    public static void parse (String[] args, List<String> params, Map<String, ? extends List<String>> options, Set<String> flags, Set<String> flagSet){

        String optionalParameterKey;
        Boolean isOptionalParameter = false;

        for(int n = 0; n < args.length; ++n){
            String p = args[n];
            if (p.charAt(0) == '-'){
                isOptionalParameter = false;
                if(p.length() > 1){
                    if(p.charAt(1) == '-' || p.length() == 2){

                        if(flagSet.contains(p)){
                            flags.add(p);
                        }
                        else{
                            options.put(p, ?.newInstance());
                            optionalParameterKey = p;
                            isOptionalParameter = true;
                        }
                    }
                    else{
                        for(int i = 1; i < p.length(); ++i){
                            flags.add("" + '-' + p.charAt(i));
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            else if(isOptionalParameter){
                options.get(optionalParameterKey).add(p);
            }
            else{
                params.add(p);
            }
        }
    }
}

Any idea?

share|improve this question
1  
In short, you can't. The type erasure wipes out type information, so it is not available at run time. More about the restrictions here. –  kiheru Sep 15 '13 at 16:13
    
Start learning generics from here –  Rohit Jain Sep 15 '13 at 16:14
    
@kiheru so what solution do you propose as a workaround for that kind of situation? –  Aurélien Ooms Sep 15 '13 at 16:15
    
Which workaround is the right one depends on the situation. The one posted by @MrLore may well be the best for static methods. –  kiheru Sep 15 '13 at 16:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Simply put: You can't do that.

You can only instantiate an Object reflectively if you have the .class object for it, or an instance of the class you can retrieve it from. However, if you change your method signature as follows:

public static <T extends List<String>> void parse(String[] args, List<String> params, Map<String, T> options, Set<String> flags, Set<String> flagSet, Class<T> klass)  throws InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException

Then when you call it add MyStringList.class (or whatever the map value type is), you can change your constructor line to:

options.put(p,  klass.newInstance());

And your code should work as expected.

Edit:

I get this => Test.java:19: illegal start of expression Pinput.parse(args, params, options, flags, flagSet, ArrayList<String>.class);

ArrayList<String> does not extend List<String>, ArrayList<T> extends List<T> and String extends Object which means it's valid as T. This would only work with a class declared as:

class MyStringList extends List<String>

Generics are not really appropriate for what you are trying to do, really you should just use this as your signature:

public static void parse(String[] args, List<String> params, Map<String, List<String>> options, Set<String> flags, Set<String> flagSet)

And manually instantiate the list as an ArrayList:

 options.put(arg,  new ArrayList<String>());

As List is only an interface, the compiler knows that you will provide some implementation of that interface, and then only allow you access to the List methods.

share|improve this answer
    
I get this => Test.java:19: illegal start of expression Pinput.parse(args, params, options, flags, flagSet, ArrayList<String>.class); –  Aurélien Ooms Sep 15 '13 at 16:27
    
@AurélienOoms See edits. –  MrLore Sep 15 '13 at 16:38
    
Sure, I was missing the whole point of interfaces. Thank you! –  Aurélien Ooms Sep 15 '13 at 16:56
    
The only thing that bothers me is that the user won't be able to choose the underlying implementation of List<String>... –  Aurélien Ooms Sep 15 '13 at 16:58

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