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I want to strip spaces to single space but preserve one empty line separator in a file. I have tried the following code and it seems to work. How can i do this with out writing to the file twice, i want to collect all my substitutions may be in a text file and write them all at once. Thnaks

i = open('inputfile.txt','r')
infile = i.readlines()
o = open('outputfile.txt','w')
for line in infile:
    if line == '\n':
        o.write('\n\n')
    else:
        o.write(re.sub(r'\s+',' ',line))
o.close()
i.close()
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Why don't you like the code you have? –  Vaughn Cato Sep 15 '13 at 16:16
    
could you clarify what you mean by writing twice? Did you just want to store all the data and do a single write call? (Also you're missing a tab for your else) –  Foon Sep 15 '13 at 16:16
    
@Foon, thats is exactly what i want, sorry for the confusion .I was thinking of "text" or just string when i wrote "text file". –  math Sep 16 '13 at 4:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

See my answer in this question here: Python save file to csv

I think the re.sub() replacement is tripping you up with the '\s' value. Just replace ' ' instead.

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brandosimpkins, your solution worked. I changed r'\s+' with [ ]+ and remove if...else. I also got the idea of storing intermediate results from the question asked over there. thanks. –  math Sep 16 '13 at 4:36
i = open('inputfile.txt','r')
infile = i.readlines()
o = open('outputfile.txt','w')
newoutputfile = ""
for line in infile:
        if line == '\n':
                newoutputfile+= '\n\n'
else:
        newoutputfile +=' '.join(line.split())
o.write(newoutputfile)
o.close()
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It would helpful to others if you updated your answer with a brief explanation of how this works, and what it does differently. –  Leigh Sep 15 '13 at 16:34
    
LeonardoPF, i was looking for something like ur solution here, but i think ur code is overwriting. it displays only the new lines and the last sentence in the input file. –  math Sep 16 '13 at 4:39
    
This has an incorrect else that is aligned to the for loop instead of the intended if block inside of the foor loop. Python has a handy but under-recognized feature that you can have a else which matches the for loop (and gets executed if your for loop executes normally). This is why it was doing the behavior you're seeing. (Of course, I was thinking it executed the else if the list-like object was empty, which I could see as also being useful for different reasons) –  Foon Sep 16 '13 at 12:55
    
@Leigh this does what math had intended to say, which is that it (with the else tabbed over properly) builds a string containing all the data and then does a single write) –  Foon Sep 16 '13 at 12:56

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