Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question is NOT a duplicate of this question.

I came across a situation where I might have had to left-shift a (positive) number by a negative value, i.e., 8 << -1. In that case, I would expect the result to be 4, but I'd never done this before. So I made up a little test program to verify my hypothesis:

for (int i = -8; i <= 4; i++)
    Console.WriteLine("i = {0}, 8 << {0} = {1}", i, 8 << i);

which to my shock and surprise gave me the following output:

i = -8, 8 << -8 = 134217728
i = -7, 8 << -7 = 268435456
i = -6, 8 << -6 = 536870912
i = -5, 8 << -5 = 1073741824
i = -4, 8 << -4 = -2147483648
i = -3, 8 << -3 = 0
i = -2, 8 << -2 = 0
i = -1, 8 << -1 = 0
i = 0, 8 << 0 = 8
i = 1, 8 << 1 = 16
i = 2, 8 << 2 = 32
i = 3, 8 << 3 = 64
i = 4, 8 << 4 = 128

Can anyone explain this behaviour?

Here's a little bonus. I changed the left-shift to a right-shift, and got this output:

i = -8, 8 >> -8 = 0
i = -7, 8 >> -7 = 0
i = -6, 8 >> -6 = 0
i = -5, 8 >> -5 = 0
i = -4, 8 >> -4 = 0
i = -3, 8 >> -3 = 0
i = -2, 8 >> -2 = 0
i = -1, 8 >> -1 = 0
i = 0, 8 >> 0 = 8
i = 1, 8 >> 1 = 4
i = 2, 8 >> 2 = 2
i = 3, 8 >> 3 = 1
i = 4, 8 >> 4 = 0
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can't shift by a negative value. You also can't shift by a large positive number.

From the C# spec (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/a1sway8w.aspx):

If first operand is an int or uint (32-bit quantity), 
the shift count is given by the low-order five bits of second operand.

...


The high-order bits of first operand are discarded and the low-order 
empty bits are zero-filled. Shift operations never cause overflows.
share|improve this answer
add comment

In C-like languages << -1 doesn't translate to >> 1. Instead the least-significant 5 bits of the shift are taken and the rest ignored, so in this case the two's complement -1 translates to << 31.

You'll get the same results from eg. JavaScript javascript:alert(8<<-8).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.