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PHP has 2 closely related functions, escapeshellarg() and escapeshellcmd(). They both seem to do similar things, namely help make a string safer to use in system()/exec()/etc.

Which one should I use? I just want to be able to take some user input and run a command on it, and not have everything blow up. If PHP had an exec-type-function that took an array of strings (like argv), which bypasses the shell, I'd use that. Similar to Python's subprocess.call() function.

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

From http://ie2.php.net/manual/en/function.escapeshellarg.php

escapeshellarg() adds single quotes around a string and quotes/escapes any existing single quotes allowing you to pass a string directly to a shell function and having it be treated as a single safe argument.

escapeshellarg, as its name indicates, is used as passing shell argument(s). For example, you want to list current directory,

$dir = ".";
system('ls '.escapeshellarg($dir));
escapeshellcmd('ls $dir');

Both do similar things and simply depends on how you handle your logic, do make sure your normalize and validate your input before passing directly to these methods for better security.

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This is not an answer. The question was what are the differences. –  cyphunk Jul 19 '12 at 8:55
    
The real question is "Which one should I use?". I think Jay answered that question. –  Li-chih Wu Nov 14 '12 at 7:50
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Generally, you'll want to use escapeshellarg, making a single argument to a shell command safe. Here's why:

Suppose you need to get a list of files in a directory. You come up with the following:

$path  = 'path/to/directory'; // From user input

$files = shell_exec('ls '.$path);
// Executes `ls path/to/directory`

(This is a bad way of doing this, but for illustration bear with me)

This works "great" for this path, but suppose the path given was something more dangerous:

$path  = 'path; rm -rf /';

$files = shell_exec('ls '.$path);
// Executes `ls path`, then `rm -rf /`;

Because the path given was used unsanitised, any command can potentially be run. We can use the escapeshell* methods to try to prevent this.

First, using escapeshellcmd:

$path = 'path; rm -rf /';

$files = shell_exec(escapeshellcmd('ls '.$path));
// Executes `ls path\; rm -rf /`;

This method only escapes characters that could lead to running multiple commands, so while it stops the major security risk, it can still lead to multiple parameters being passed in.

Now, using espaceshellarg:

$path = 'path; rm -rf /';

$files = shell_exec('ls '.escapeshellarg($path));
// Executes `ls 'path; rm -rf /'`;

That gives us the result we want. You'll notice it's quoted the entire argument, so individual spaces, etc, do not need to be escaped. If the argument were to have quotes itself, they would be quoted.

To summarise, escapeshellcmd makes sure a string is only one command, while escapeshellarg makes a string safe to use as a single argument to a command.

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The PHP docs spell out the difference:

escapeshellcmd:

Following characters are preceded by a backslash: #&;`|*?~<>^()[]{}$\, \x0A and \xFF. ' and " are escaped only if they are not paired. In Windows, all these characters plus % are replaced by a space instead.

escapeshellarg:

adds single quotes around a string and quotes/escapes any existing single quotes allowing you to pass a string directly to a shell function and having it be treated as a single safe argument.

Source:

http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.escapeshellcmd.php http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.escapeshellarg.php

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