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I am in need of a way to get the binary representation of a string in python. e.g.

st = "hello world"
toBinary(st)

Is there a module of some neat way of doing this?

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7  
What do you expect the output to be, specifically? – NPE Sep 15 '13 at 18:20
    
By "binary", do you mean 0101010 type or the ordinal number of each character in (e.g. hex)? – cdarke Sep 15 '13 at 18:23
    
Assuming that you actually mean binary (zeros and ones), do you want a binary representation of each character (8 bits per character) one after another? e.g. h is ascii value 104 would be 01101000 in binary – ChrisProsser Sep 15 '13 at 18:30
    
This question has been answered many times on stackoverflow: stackoverflow.com/questions/11599226/… stackoverflow.com/questions/8553310/… – caffinatedmonkey Sep 15 '13 at 18:32
    
possible duplicate of Convert Binary to ASCII and vice versa (Python) – J.F. Sebastian Mar 12 '14 at 10:59
up vote 32 down vote accepted

Something like this?

>>> st = "hello world"
>>> ' '.join(format(ord(x), 'b') for x in st)
'1101000 1100101 1101100 1101100 1101111 100000 1110111 1101111 1110010 1101100 1100100'

#using `bytearray`
>>> ' '.join(format(x, 'b') for x in bytearray(st))
'1101000 1100101 1101100 1101100 1101111 100000 1110111 1101111 1110010 1101100 1100100'
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9  
Or if you want each binary number to be 1 byte: ' '.join(format(ord(i),'b').zfill(8) for i in st) – ChrisProsser Sep 15 '13 at 18:39
3  
For full bytes you can also use ' '.join('{0:08b}'.format(ord(x), 'b') for x in st), which is about 35% faster than the zfill(8) solution (at least on my machine). – max Jun 11 '15 at 11:12

As a more pythonic way you can first convert your string to byte array then use bin function within map :

>>> st = "hello world"
>>> map(bin,bytearray(st))
['0b1101000', '0b1100101', '0b1101100', '0b1101100', '0b1101111', '0b100000', '0b1110111', '0b1101111', '0b1110010', '0b1101100', '0b1100100']

Or you can join it:

>>> ' '.join(map(bin,bytearray(st)))
'0b1101000 0b1100101 0b1101100 0b1101100 0b1101111 0b100000 0b1110111 0b1101111 0b1110010 0b1101100 0b1100100'

Note that in python3 you need to specify an encoding for bytearray function :

>>> ' '.join(map(bin,bytearray(st,'utf8')))
'0b1101000 0b1100101 0b1101100 0b1101100 0b1101111 0b100000 0b1110111 0b1101111 0b1110010 0b1101100 0b1100100'

You can also use binascii module in python 2:

>>> import binascii
>>> bin(int(binascii.hexlify(st),16))
'0b110100001100101011011000110110001101111001000000111011101101111011100100110110001100100'

hexlify return the hexadecimal representation of the binary data then you can convert to int by specifying 16 as its base then convert it to binary with bin.

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You can access the code values for the characters in your string using the ord() built-in function. If you then need to format this in binary, the string.format() method will do the job.

a = "test"
print(' '.join(format(ord(x), 'b') for x in a))

(Thanks to Ashwini Chaudhary for posting that code snippet.)

While the above code works in Python 3, this matter gets more complicated if you're assuming any encoding other than UTF-8. In Python 2, strings are byte sequences, and ASCII encoding is assumed by default. In Python 3, strings are assumed to be Unicode, and there's a separate bytes type that acts more like a Python 2 string. If you wish to assume any encoding other than UTF-8, you'll need to specify the encoding.

In Python 3, then, you can do something like this:

a = "test"
a_bytes = bytes(a, "ascii")
print(' '.join(["{0:b}".format(x) for x in a_bytes]))

The differences between UTF-8 and ascii encoding won't be obvious for simple alphanumeric strings, but will become important if you're processing text that includes characters not in the ascii character set.

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