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Here's piece of code for my threads learning test:

int mylock = 0;

void *r1(void *x)
{
  puts("entered r1");
  int *p;
  p = (int *)x;
  int i = *p;
  sleep(1);
  *p = --i;
  printf("r1: %d\n",*p);
  mylock = 1;
  printf("r1: done\n");
#ifdef USETHREADS
  pthread_exit(0);
#endif
}

void *r2(void *x)
{
  puts("entered r2");
  if (!mylock) {
          puts("r2 is waiting...");
          while (!mylock)
                printf("");
  }
  int *p;
  p = (int *)x;
  int i = *p;
  *p = ++i;
  sleep(1);
  printf("r2: %d\n",*p);
  printf("r2: done\n");
#ifdef USETHREADS
  pthread_exit(0);
#endif
}

main()
{
  int i1,i2;
  i1 = 1;
  i2 = 2;
  printf("i1: %d\n", i1);
#ifdef USETHREADS
  pthread_t r1_thread, r2_thread;
  pthread_create(&r1_thread, NULL, r1, &i1);
  pthread_create(&r2_thread, NULL, r2, &i1);
  pthread_join(r1_thread, NULL);
  pthread_join(r2_thread, NULL);
#else
  r1(&i1);
  r2(&i1);
#endif
  printf("i1: %d\n", i1);
  return 0;
}

So two threads, one is increasing i1 and one decreasing (I am aware of "mutexes" in pthreads, not using at this time though), so to avoid race condition I create mylock (which fakes mutex i guess), and what surprises me is the process gets stuck in an indefined loop while waiting for mylock to change value, unless i call printf in a wait loop, with printf call it exits in just as expected 2sec, is that linux mistery?

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4  
"I am aware of "mutexes" in pthreads, not using at this time though" - that's your problem. A plain int isn't a synchronization primitive. –  Mat Sep 15 '13 at 18:24
    
I agree with @Mat. The approach above avoiding purpose built synchronisation operations is going in very, very deep, very fast, and the failures are likely to be random and hard to reproduce. –  marko Sep 15 '13 at 19:01
2  
Declaring it volatile is usually a band-aid. Not the kind you look for when your code is bleeding like this. –  Hans Passant Sep 15 '13 at 19:26
    
At the very least (to have even a hint of a chance of predictable behavior) mylock needs to be volatile and there needs to be some sort of wait operation inside the loop (to assure that the other thread can even execute). But still there would be problem scenarios on many architectures. (The printf is likely partially fulfilling both requirements.) –  Hot Licks Sep 15 '13 at 19:31
    
On any SMP system there is potentially an indeterminate time between CPU A writing mylock and it being observable by CPU B. Declaring mylock as volatile does nothing to change this situation. –  marko Sep 15 '13 at 23:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your program is invoking undefined behavior by accessing mylock without synchronization. You need to call pthread_mutex_lock (on a mutex you've chosen to protect the state of mylock) before accessing it, and pthread_mutex_unlock when you're done. Of course, then mylock is probably useless; you can just use pthread_mutex_lock directly for the locking.

With that said, if you're trying to learn threads, you're going about it in totally the wrong way. You don't start by trying to roll your own synchronization primitives. For the most part, you should never do this, even if you're an expert, unless you have really unusual needs, and even then it's probably a bad idea. Get yourself a good threads tutorial that teaches you how to use the synchronization primitives correctly, and then use them.

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All of the accesses to mylock are atomic. So protecting mylock isn't the reason the code is failing. The mutex would eliminate the spinning, an obvious benefit. –  johnnycrash Sep 17 '13 at 2:41
    
Atomicity is not the issue. Synchronization is. You simply cannot make access like you're trying to. And since you stated that you're learning and don't know what you're doing, you shouldn't even be trying to. As for the spinning, is not a benefit. It's harmful. But if you really want to spin, POSIX threads has spinlocks you can use. –  R.. Sep 17 '13 at 3:19
    
I assume that comment was for user2013697, since I didn't ask the question. I was just trying to clarify that the source of the infinite loop was a compiler optimization, not synchronization per se. –  johnnycrash Sep 17 '13 at 4:26
    
It could equally be a CPU optimization. There is no guarantee writes from one core will ever be visible to other cores without synchronization. –  R.. Sep 17 '13 at 13:44
    
Woah, explain that one! You are saying that a thread on one core can write to memory and threads on other cores might never see it? –  johnnycrash Sep 18 '13 at 1:59

Even with the printf it could get stuck, because the compiler is allowed to assume that printf does not change mylock (which is in fact true, printf does not change mylock).

In this case, given a loop of the form:

while (!x)
    some_code;

the compiler "looks around" at the some_code inside the loop to determine what effect (if any) it has on x. For instance, if the loop were known to count it down one at a time, such as with x -= 1 or similar, the compiler could sample x once at the top of the loop and then "unroll" the loop: if x >= 4, it could replace this with:

while (x >= 4) {
    some_code;
    some_code;
    some_code;
    some_code;
}
switch (x) {
case 3:
    some_code;  /* and, no "break" */
case 2:
    some_code;
case 1:
    some_code;
}

which speeds up run-time by eliminating various tests. (If x is "dead", i.e., not used again, after the loop, in the three cleanup cases the compiler could remove the x -= 1 part as well.)

Here, x (or rather, my_lock) is not changed at all, so the loop is infinite: the compiler can, and does, replace the while with:

if (my_lock)
    for (;;) continue;

In this particular case, you can probably make things work by declaring my_lock with the volatile qualifier:

volatile int my_lock;

This tells the compiler that something unusual happens with the variable: it's modified in ways the compiler cannot perceive by normal means. But this is not guaranteed, while pthread mutexes do come with guarantees. The volatile keyword is meant more as a tool that whoever writes a pthread mutex implementation can use, than for end-users.

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2  
Using volatile probably does work in this limited case, but does nothing to address a whole bunch data coherency issues between multiple CPUs that will rear their ugly head in anything more complex. Use of volatile in multithreaded code is a total red-flag. If you really want to write your own spin-locks rather than use POSIX synchronisation operations, a thorough understanding of the use of memory barriers is required. –  marko Sep 15 '13 at 18:58
    
@Marko: yes, that's why I emphasized "probably" and "not guaranteed". "It's a tool, not a solution." –  torek Sep 15 '13 at 22:58
1  
Sure - I'm just not sure it's an even vaguely appropriate one for somebody learning the basics of pthreads. –  marko Sep 15 '13 at 23:08
    
Shouldn't the compiler know global variables can change behind the scenes and not make the optimization you are talking about? I am not saying that it isn't doing what you are saying, just asking why it's doing it to a global variable. –  johnnycrash Sep 17 '13 at 2:37
1  
@johnnycrash: Definitely not "all" optimizers, especially in Ye Olden Dayse when optimization consisted mainly of instruction selection for each line followed by peephole optimization. But compiler-writers have the same pressures as everyone else: once there's one "good one" out there, you can no longer slack off so much. :D –  torek Sep 17 '13 at 15:37

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