Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've read a bunch of posts regarding redirecting std::cout to stringstreams, but I'm having problem reading the redirected string.

std::stringstream redirectStream;
std::cout.rdbuf( redirectStream.rdbuf() );

std::cout << "Hello1\n";
std::cout << "Hello2\n";

while(std::getline(redirectStream, str))
{
  // This does not work - as the contents of redirectStream 
  // do not include the '\n' - I only see "Hello1Hello2"
}

I need to pick out the new lines within the initial output - can anyone enlighten me as to how to do that?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
For your information, this works on my machine. (Visual C++ 2008) – KeatsPeeks Dec 10 '09 at 15:31
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Works fine for me:
Note: the std::getline() reads the line (but not the '\n' character, the line terminator is thrown away after each line is read). But the loop will be entered once for each line.

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

int main()
{
    std::stringstream   redirectStream;
    std::streambuf*     oldbuf  = std::cout.rdbuf( redirectStream.rdbuf() );

    std::cout << "Hello1\n";
    std::cout << "Hello2\n";

    std::string str;
    while(std::getline(redirectStream, str))
    {
        fprintf(stdout,"Line: %s\n",str.c_str());
        // loop enter once for each line.
        // Note: str does not include the '\n' character.
    }

    // In real life use RAII to do this. Simplified here for code clarity.
    std::cout.rdbuf(oldbuf);
}

Note: you need to put the old stream-buffer back in std::cout. Once the stringstream 'redirectStream' goes out of scope its buffer will be destroyed leaving std::cout pointing at an invalid stream-buffer. Since std::cout lives longer than 'redirectStream' you need to make sure that std::cout does not access an invalid object. Thus the easiest solution is to put back the old buffer.

share|improve this answer

Thanks for the response. I can kind of see what I've done wrong. Because I stripped out a lot of code to simplify my issue, yes I did actually post a working version! It seems my actual logic was the problem:

// Basically... 
std::string str; 
std::stringstream redirectstream; 
// perform the redirection... 
// ... 

while (!done)
{ 
  while(std::getline(redirectStream, str)) 
  { 
    // stuff... 
  } 
  std::cout << "Hello1\n"; 
  std::cout << "Hello2\n"; 
}

It appears that the getline() function no longer appears to be valid in this situation. Can you please explain this?

I realize this is a completely different problem now and I apologize for misleading with a bad initial post.

share|improve this answer
1  
Welcome to Stack Overflow. The answer section is for answers to the question, not for responses to other answers, or for follow-up questions. To respond to an answer, use the "comment" section below each answer. (The minimum reputation is waived when commenting on your own question page.) I have voted to close this question as "no longer relevant" since you admit that what you posted wasn't really a problem. I advise you to start over and post a new question with what you've written in this "answer." (There are answers already, so editing the question will just confuse things.) – Rob Kennedy Dec 10 '09 at 19:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.