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Just wondering what little scripts/programs people here have written that helps one with his or her everyday life (aka not work related).

Anything goes, groundbreaking or not. For me right now, it's a small python script to calculate running pace given distance and time elapsed.

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closed as not constructive by Bill the Lizard Oct 25 '11 at 16:07

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78 Answers 78

I use procmail to sort my incoming email to different folders. Because I have trouble remembering the procmailrc syntax, I use m4 as a preprocessor. Here's how my procmailrc begins (this isn't the script yet):

divert(-1)
changequote(<<, >>)
define(mailinglistrule, 
<<:0:
* $2
Lists/$1
>>)
define(listdt, <<mailinglistrule($1,^Delivered-To:.*$2)>>)
define(listid, <<mailinglistrule($1,^List-Id:.*<$2>)>>)
divert# Generated from .procmailrc.m4 -- DO NOT EDIT

This defines two macros for mailing lists, so e.g. listdt(foo, foo@example.com) expands to

:0:
* ^Delivered-To:.*foo@example.com
Lists/foo

meaning that emails with a Delivered-To header containing foo@example.com should be put in the Lists/foo folder. It also arranges the processed file to begin with a comment that warns me not to edit that file directly.

Now, frankly, m4 scares me: what if I accidentally redefine a macro and procmail starts discarding all my email, or something like that? That's why I have a script, which I call update-procmailrc, that shows me in diff format how my procmailrc is going to change. If the change is just a few lines and looks roughly like what I intended, I can happily approve it, but if there are huge changes to the file, I know to look at my edits more carefully.

#! /bin/sh

PROCMAILRC=.procmailrc
TMPNAM=.procmailrc.tmp.$$
cd $HOME
umask 077
trap "rm -f $TMPNAM" 0

m4 < .procmailrc.m4 > $TMPNAM
diff -u $PROCMAILRC $TMPNAM

echo -n 'Is this acceptable? (y/N) '
read accept

if [ -z "$accept" ]; then
    accept=n
fi

if [ $accept = 'y' -o $accept = 'Y' ]; then
    mv -f $TMPNAM $PROCMAILRC && \
    chmod 400 $PROCMAILRC && \
    echo "Created new $PROCMAILRC"
    if [ "$?" -ne 0 ]; then
        echo "*** FAILED creating $PROCMAILRC"
    fi
else
    echo "Didn't update $PROCMAILRC"
fi

The script hasn't yet prevented any email disasters, but it has made me less anxious about changing my procmailrc.

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A script that reads a config file in the current dir, logs into an FTP account, and uploads all files that have changed since the last time it was run. Really handy for clients who use shared hosting, and FTP is my only option for file access.

http://lucasoman.com/code/updater

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I got a script which extracts id3 tags encodes the songs newly in a certain format, and then adds them according to the tags to my music library.

300 lines of python. Mostly because lame isn't able to deal with tags in a nice fashion.

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The most useful? But there are so many...

  1. d.cmd contains: @dir /ad /on
  2. dd.cmd contains: @dir /a-d /on
  3. x.cmd contains: @exit
  4. s.cmd contains: @start .
  5. sx.cmd contains: @start . & exit
  6. ts.cmd contains the following, which allows me to properly connect to another machine's console session over RDP regardless of whether I'm on Vista SP1 or not.

    @echo off

    ver | find "6.0.6001"

    if ERRORLEVEL 0 if not errorlevel 1 (set TSCONS=admin) ELSE set TSCONS=console

    echo Issuing command: mstsc /%TSCONS% /v %1

    start mstsc /%TSCONS% /v %1

(Sorry for the weird formatting, apparently you can't have more than one code sample per answer?)

From a command prompt I'll navigate to where my VS solution file is, and then I'll want to open it, but I'm too lazy to type blah.sln and press enter. So I wrote sln.cmd:

@echo off
if not exist *.sln goto csproj
for %%f in (*.sln) do start /max %%f
goto end

:csproj
for %%f in (*.csproj) do start /max %%f
goto end

:end

So I just type sln and press enter and it opens the solution file, if any, in the current directory. I wrap things like pushd and popd in pd.cmd and pop.cmd.

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MySQL backup. I made a Windows batch script that would create incremental backups of MySQL databases, create a fresh dump every day and back them up every 10 minutes on a remote server. It saved my ass countless times, especially in the countless situations where a client would call, yelling their head off that a record just "disappeared" from the database. I went "no problem, let's see what happened" because I also wrote a binary search script that would look for the last moment when a record was present in the database. From there it would be pretty easy to understand who "stole" it and why.
You wouldn't imagine how useful these have been and I've been using them for almost 5 years. I wouldn't switch to anything else simply because they've been roughly tested and they're custom made, meaning they do exactly what I need and nothing more but I've tweaked them so much that it would be a snap to add extra functionalities.
So, my "masterpiece" is a MySQL incremental backup + remote backup + logs search system for Windows. I also wrote a version for Linux but I've lost it somewhere, probably because it was only about 15 lines + a cron job instead of Windows' about 1,200 lines + two scheduled tasks.

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Not every day, but I did use XSLT script to create my wedding invitations (a Pages file for the inserts to the invite cards, and an HTML file for the address labels).

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VBS script to create a YYYY/YYYY-MM/YYYY-MM-DD file structure in my photos folder and move photos from my camera to the appropriate folder.

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I wrote some lines of code to automatically tweak all things powertop suggests when I unplug my laptop and undo that if I plug the laptop back in. Maximum power, maximum efficiency, maximum convenience.

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I suppose this depends on how you define useful, but my favorite little script is a variant on the *nix fortune program. See below, and you'll get the idea of what it does:

telemachus ~ $ haiku 

   January--
in other provinces,
   plums blooming.
    Issa

It doesn't really get anything done, but a nice haiku goes a long way. (I like how the colorizer decided to interpret the poem.) (Edit: If I really have to be useful, I'd say a script that allows a user to enter a US zipcode and get current weather and 0-3 days of forecast from Google.)

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A small task-bar program that extracted every error-code constant out of a third-party JavaDoc and let me lookup the constant-name for a given error code. Plus, add in any conversions from HEX to decimal, etc.

This comes up a lot when working in the debugger--you get back the error code, but then tracking back the code to text is a huge pain. It's even more common when working with software that wraps native methods, OS calls, or COM... often times, the constants are copied straight out of an error header file with no additional context, repeated values, and no enumerations.

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A similar backup.sh for each project, that tars and gzips just the source, moves it into a snapshot directory and labels it with timestamp: project-mmddyy-hhmmss. Useful for coding between commits.

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I had a version control script that would take a directory as an argument, and recursively copy all files to ../dirname/DATE/TIME/

Obviously it was a crappy way to do things, but it was handy before installing a real version control package.

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Called assignIisSite_ToAppPool.js

Really useful when you want to make sure that some resources are properly mapped.

:)

SetAppPool("W3SVC/1059997624/Root", "MyAppPool");



function SetAppPool(webId, appPoolName)
{
var providerObj=GetObject("winmgmts:/root/MicrosoftIISv2");
var vdirObj=providerObj.get("IIsWebVirtualDirSetting='" + webId + "'");
vdirObj.AppPoolId=appPoolName;
vdirObj.Put_();
}
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#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use utf8;
use Encode;
use File::Find;
binmode STDOUT, ':utf8';
sub orderly {
    my ($x, $y) = @_{$a, $b};
    if (my $z = $x <=> $y) {return $z}
    $x = length $a;
    $y = length $b;
    my $z = $x < $y ? $x : $y;
    if (substr($a, 0, $z) eq substr($b, 0, $z)) {
        return $y <=> $x;
    }
    else {
        return $a cmp $b;
    }
}
my %conf = map +($_ => 0), split //, 'acsxL';
sub Stat {$conf{L} ? lstat : stat}
my @dirs = ();
while (defined ($_ = shift)) {
    if ($_ eq "--") {push @dirs, @ARGV; last}
    elsif (/^-(.*)$/s) {
        for (split //, $1) {
            if (!exists $conf{$_} or $conf{$_} = 1 and $conf{a} and $conf{s}) {
                print STDERR "$0 [-a] [-c] [-s] [-x] [-L] [--] ...\n";
                exit 1;
            }
        }
    }
    else {push @dirs, $_}
}
s/\/*$//s for @dirs;  # */ SO has crappy syntax highlighting
@dirs = qw(.) unless @dirs;
my %spec = (follow => $conf{L}, no_chdir => 1);
if ($conf{a}) {
    $spec{wanted} = sub {
        Stat;
        my $s = -f _ ? -s _ : 0;
        decode(utf8 => $File::Find::name) =~ /^\Q$dirs[0]\E\/?(.*)$/s;
        my @a = split /\//, $1;
        for (unshift @a, $dirs[0]; @a; pop @a) {
            $_{join "/", @a} += $s;
        }
    };
}
elsif ($conf{s}) {
    $spec{wanted} = sub {
        Stat;
        $_{$dirs[0]} += -f _ ? -s _ : 0;
    };
}
else {
    $spec{wanted} = sub {
        Stat;
        my $s = -f _ ? -s _ : 0;
        decode(utf8 => $File::Find::name) =~ /^\Q$dirs[0]\E\/?(.*)$/s;
        my @a = split /\//, $1;
        ! -d _ and pop @a;
        for (unshift @a, $dirs[0]; @a; pop @a) {
            $_{join "/", @a} += $s;
        }
    };
}
if ($conf{x}) {
    $spec{preprocess} = sub {
        my $dev = (Stat $File::Find::dir)[0];
        grep {$dev == (Stat "$File::Find::dir/$_")[0]} @_;
    };
}
while (@dirs) {
    find(\%spec, $dirs[0] eq "" ? "/" : $dirs[0]);
    $_{""} += $_{$dirs[0]} if $conf{c};
    shift @dirs;
}
$_{$_} < 1024 ** 1 ? printf "%s «%-6.6sB» %s\n", $_{$_}, sprintf("%6.6f", "$_{$_}" / 1024 ** 0), $_ :
$_{$_} < 1024 ** 2 ? printf "%s «%-6.6sK» %s\n", $_{$_}, sprintf("%6.6f", "$_{$_}" / 1024 ** 1), $_ :
$_{$_} < 1024 ** 3 ? printf "%s «%-6.6sM» %s\n", $_{$_}, sprintf("%6.6f", "$_{$_}" / 1024 ** 2), $_ :
$_{$_} < 1024 ** 4 ? printf "%s «%-6.6sG» %s\n", $_{$_}, sprintf("%6.6f", "$_{$_}" / 1024 ** 3), $_ :
$_{$_} < 1024 ** 5 ? printf "%s «%-6.6sT» %s\n", $_{$_}, sprintf("%6.6f", "$_{$_}" / 1024 ** 4), $_ :
$_{$_} < 1024 ** 6 ? printf "%s «%-6.6sP» %s\n", $_{$_}, sprintf("%6.6f", "$_{$_}" / 1024 ** 5), $_ :
$_{$_} < 1024 ** 7 ? printf "%s «%-6.6sE» %s\n", $_{$_}, sprintf("%6.6f", "$_{$_}" / 1024 ** 6), $_ :
$_{$_} < 1024 ** 8 ? printf "%s «%-6.6sZ» %s\n", $_{$_}, sprintf("%6.6f", "$_{$_}" / 1024 ** 7), $_ :
                     printf "%s «%-6.6sY» %s\n", $_{$_}, sprintf("%6.6f", "$_{$_}" / 1024 ** 8), $_
    for grep {$_{$_} > 0} sort orderly keys %_;

I save it in ~/bin/dush, it acts as a sort of du -h/du | sort -n hybrid: sorts and gives human-readable sizes all at once. Very useful for finding what's taking up disk space.

In a similar vein,

#!/usr/bin/perl
$t = 1;
%p = map {$_ => ($t *= 1024)} qw(K M G T P E Z Y);
$t = 4707319808;
if (@ARGV) {
    if (($_ = shift) =~ /^-*dvd/i) {$t = 4707319808}
    elsif (/^-*cd[^w]*$/i) {$t = 737280000}
    elsif (/^-*cd/i) {$t = 681984000}
    elsif (/^-*([\d.]+)([kmgtpezy])/i) {$t = $1 * ($p{"\U$2"} || 1)}
    elsif (/^-*([\d.]+)/) {$t = $1}
    else {unshift @ARGV, $_}
}
($q, $r, $s) = (0, ($ENV{COLUMNS} || 80) - 13, $t);
while (<>) {
    chomp, stat;
    unless (-e _) {
        print STDERR "$_ does not exist\n";
        next;
    }
    if (($s += -s _) > $t) {
        $s && $s < $t && printf "-%7s %s\n",
            sprintf("%2.3f%%", 100 * ($t - $s) / $t), $t - $s;
        printf "-----------%d%*s\n", ++$q, $r, "-" x $r;
        $s = -s _;
    }
    printf "%8s %s\n",
        sprintf("%3.3f%%", $s * 100 / $t),
        /.{4}(.{$r})$/s ? "...$1" : $_;
}
$s && $s < $t && printf "-%7s %s\n",
    sprintf("%2.3f%%", 100 * ($t - $s) / $t), $t - $s;

I save this as ~/bin/fit. When I'm archiving a bunch of files, I run ls | fit or ls | fit -cdrw to help determine if it'll fit on a DVD/CD/CDRW, and where to split them if they don't.

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I use a DOS program that errors out if it's past a certain date. I just looked at the batch file that it was using to start up and changed it so it would first change the date to 2000, then run the program. On the program's exit, it changed the date back to what it was before it was changed.

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I wrote a cron job to grab the ip address of my dads router and ftp it to a secure location so when he needed help I could remote desktop in and fix his comp.

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As a scheduled task, to copy any modified/new files from entire drive d: to backup drive g:, and to log the files copied. It helps me keep track of what I did when, as well.

justdate is a small program to prints the date and time to the screen

g:

cd \drive_d

d:

cd \

type g:\backup_d.log >> g:\logs\backup_d.log

echo ========================================== > g:\backup_d.log

d:\mu\bmutil\justdate >> g:\backup_d.log

xcopy /s /d /y /c . g:\drive_d >> g:\backup_d.log

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For those of us who don't remember where we are on unix, or which SID we are using.
Pop this in your .profile.


function CD
{
unalias cd
command cd "$@" && PS1="\${ORACLE_SID}:$(hostname):$PWD> "
alias cd=CD
}
alias cd=CD

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I wrote a script for formatting C source files that automatically indents the code using an appropriate combination of tab and space characters, such that the file will appear correct regardless of what the tab setting on your editor is.

Source code is here.

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Well back in 2005 I used Gentoo Linux and I used a lot a small program called genlop to show me the history of what I've emerged (installed) on my gentoo box. Well to simplify my work I've written not a small python script but a large one, but at that time I just started using python:

    #!/usr/bin/python
##############################################
# Gentoo emerge status              #   
# This script requires genlop,           #   
# you can install it using `emerge genlop`.  #
# Milot Shala <milot@mymyah.com>        #
##############################################

import sys
import os
import time

#colors
color={}
color["r"]="\x1b[31;01m"
color["g"]="\x1b[32;01m"
color["b"]="\x1b[34;01m"
color["0"]="\x1b[0m"


def r(txt):
   return color["r"]+txt+color["0"]
def g(txt):
   return color["g"]+txt+color["0"]
def b(txt):
   return color["b"]+txt+color["0"]

# View Options
def view_opt():   

   print
   print
   print g("full-info - View full information for emerged package")
   print g("cur - View current emerge")
   print g("hist - View history of emerged packages by day")
   print g("hist-all - View full list of history of emerged packages")
   print g("rsync - View rsync history")
   print g("time - View time for compiling a package")
   print g("time-unmerged - View time of unmerged packages")
   print
   command = raw_input(r("Press Enter to return to main "))
   if command == '':
      c()
      program()
   else:
      c()
      program()

# system command 'clear'
def c():
   os.system('clear')


# Base program
def program():
   c()
   print g("Gentoo emerge status script")
   print ("---------------------------")
   print

   print ("1]") + g(" Enter options")
   print ("2]") + g(" View options")
   print ("3]") + g(" Exit")
   print
   command = input("[]> ")


   if command == 1:   
      print
      print r("""First of all  you must view options to know what to use, you can enter option name ( if you know any ) or type `view-opt` to view options.""")
      print
      time.sleep(2)
      command = raw_input(b("Option name: "))
      if (command == 'view-opt' or command == 'VIEW-OPT'):
         view_opt()


      elif command == 'full-info':
         c()
         print g("Full information for a single package")
         print ("-------------------------------------")
         print
         print b("Enter package name")
         command=raw_input("> ")
         c()
         print g("Full information for package"), b(command)
         print ("-----------------------------------")
         print
         pack=['genlop -i '+command]
         pack_=" ".join(pack)
         os.system(pack_)
         print
         print r("Press Enter to return to main.")
         command=raw_input()
         if command == '':
            c()
            program()

         else:
            c()
            program()


      elif command == 'cur':
         if command == 'cur':
            c()
            print g("Current emerge session(s)")
            print ("-------------------------")
            print
            print b("Listing current emerge session(s)")
            print
            time.sleep(1)
            os.system('genlop -c')
            print
            print r("Press Enter to return to main.")
            command = raw_input()
            if (command == ''):
               c()
               program()

            else:
               c()
               program()


      elif command == 'hist':
         if command == 'hist':
            c()
            print g("History of merged packages")
            print ("---------------------------")
            print
            time.sleep(1)
            print b("Enter number of how many days ago you want to see the packages")
            command = raw_input("> ")
            c()
            print g("Packages merged "+b(command)+ g(" day(s) before"))
            print ("------------------------------------")
            pkg=['genlop --list --date '+command+' days ago']
            pkg_=" ".join(pkg)
            os.system(pkg_)
            print
            print r("Press Enter to return to main.")
            command = raw_input()
            if command == '':
               c()
               program()

            else:
               c()
               program()


      elif command == 'hist-all':
            c()
            print g("Full history of merged individual packages")
            print ("--------------------------------------")
            print
            print b("Do you want to view individual package?")
            print r("YES/NO?")
            command = raw_input("> ")
            print
            if (command == 'yes' or command == 'YES'):
               print g("Enter package name")
               command = raw_input("> ")
               print
               pkg=['genlop -l | grep '+command+ ' | less']
               pkg_=" ".join(pkg)
               os.system(pkg_)
               print
               print r("Press Enter to return to main")
               command = raw_input()
               if command == '':
                  c()
                  program()
               else:
                  c()
                  program()

            elif (command == 'no' or command == 'NO'):
               pkg=['genlop -l | less']
               pkg_=" ".join(pkg)
               os.system(pkg_)
               print
               print r("Press Enter to return to main")
               command = raw_input()
               if command == '':
                  c()
                  program()

               else:
                  c()
                  program()

            else:
               c()
               program()


      elif command == 'rsync':
         print g("RSYNC updates")
         print
         print
         print
         print b("You can view rsynced time by year!")
         print r("Do you want this script to do it for you? (yes/no)")
         command = raw_input("> ")
         if (command == 'yes' or command == 'YES'):
            print
            print g("Enter year i.e"), b("2005")
            print
            command = raw_input("> ")
            rsync=['genlop -r | grep '+command+' | less']
            rsync_=" ".join(rsync)
            os.system(rsync_)
            print
            print r("Press Enter to return to main.")
            c()
            program()
         elif (command == 'no' or command == 'NO'):
            os.system('genlop -r | less')
            print
            print r("Press Enter to return to main.")
            command = raw_input()
            if command == '':
               c()
               program()

            else:
               c()
               program()

      elif command == 'time':
         c()
         print g("Time of package compilation")
         print ("---------------------------")
         print
         print

         print b("Enter package name")
         pkg_name = raw_input("> ")
         pkg=['emerge '+pkg_name+' -p | genlop -p | less']
         pkg_=" ".join(pkg)
         os.system(pkg_)
         print
         print r("Press Enter to return to main")
         time.sleep(2)
         command = raw_input()
         if command == '':
            c()
            program()

         else:
            c()
            program()


      elif command == 'time-unmerged':
         c()
         print g("Show when package(s) is/when is unmerged")
         print ("----------------------------------------")
         print

         print b("Enter package name: ")
         name = raw_input("> ")
         pkg=['genlop -u '+name]
         pkg_=" ".join(pkg)
         os.system(pkg_)
         print
         print r("Press Enter to return to main")
         time.sleep(2)
         command = raw_input()
         if command == '':
            c()
            program()

         else:
            c()
            program()

      else:
         print
         print r("Wrong Selection!")
         time.sleep(2)
         c()
         program()


   elif command == 2:
      view_opt()
      command = raw_input(r("Press Enter to return to main "))
      if command == '':
         c()
         program()
      else:
         c()
         program()


   elif command == 3:
      print
      print b("Thank you for using this script")
      print
      time.sleep(1)
      sys.exit()

   else:
      print
      print r("Wrong Selection!")
      time.sleep(2)
      c()
      program()
      command = ("")


program()
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A python script that does a filewalk and prints my directory tree sorted by disk usage.

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Anime CRC32 checksum:

#!/usr/bin/python                                                                                                                                                                                  

import sys, re, zlib

c_null="^[[00;00m"
c_red="^[[31;01m"
c_green="^[[32;01m"

def crc_checksum(filename):
    filedata = open(filename, "rb").read()
    sum = zlib.crc32(filedata)
    if sum < 0:
        sum &= 16**8-1
    return "%.8X" %(sum)

for file in sys.argv[1:]:
    sum = crc_checksum(file)
    try:
        dest_sum = re.split('[\[\]]', file)[-2]
        if sum == dest_sum:
            c_in = c_green
        else:
            c_in = c_red
        sfile = file.split(dest_sum)
        print "%s%s%s   %s%s%s%s%s" % (c_in, sum, c_null, sfile[0], c_in, dest_sum, c_null, sfile[1])
    except IndexError:
        print "%s   %s" %(sum, file)
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alias snoot='find . ! -path "*/.svn*" -print0 | xargs -0 egrep '
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I have a batch file which establishes a VPN connection and then enters an infinite loop, pinging a machine on the other side of the connection every five minutes so that the VPN server doesn't drop the connection due to inactivity if I don't generate any traffic over that connection for a while.

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Best real-life script?

Me: (Enters room) "Boss, I want a raise."

Boss: (Offers chair from behind desk) "A raise? Please, take my job!"

Then again, that may be the worst script!

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I often use a MS Word macro that takes a source-code file, formats it in two columns of monospaced type on a landscape page, numbers the lines, and adds company header and footer info such as filename, print date, page number, and confidentiality statement.

Printing both sides of the page uses about 1/4 the paper as the equivalent lpr command. (Does anyone use lpr anymore???)

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I've written a small shell script, tapt, for Debian based system. esp. Ubuntu. What it basically does is to post all your "apt-get" activities to your twitter account. It helps me to keep the track of what and when I've installed/remove programs in my Ubuntu system. I created a new Twitter account just for this and kept it private. Really useful. More information here: http://www.quicktweaks.com/tapt/

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A simply Python script that converts line endings from Unix to Windows that I stuck in my system32 directory. It's been lost to the ages for a few months, now, but basically it'd convert a list of known text-based file types to Windows line endings, and you could specify which files to convert, or all files, for a wildcard list.

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A Rakefile in my downloads directory containing tasks that copy files from said directory to their respective media archives on external drives. Given my internet speed and storage capacity, it would take me hours out of every week to just copy across and re-name appropriately every piece of media that is downloaded (completely legally, I might add) by hellanzb.

Another very useful task in the same file logs into and scrapes IMDB for episode lists / discographies of all the media I have, and then checks NewzBin for reports that would fill any holes I have.

Combined, this means I have to do absolutely nothing, and in exchange, I wake up every morning with more media than I could possibly consume in that day sitting on my external hard drives.

Did I mention that this is all entirely above-board and legal? d-:

I'll probably merge this all into a sort of command-line media manager/player (farming things out to mplayer), and publish it on GitHub when I have the time.

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Work@Home.ps1 and Work@Work.ps1 => modify the hosts file, to go through LAN or WAN addresses.

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