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I have seen many state machines implemented like this one from Altera:

ARCHITECTURE a OF state_machine IS
   TYPE STATE_TYPE IS (s0, s1, s2);
   SIGNAL state   : STATE_TYPE;
BEGIN
   PROCESS (clk, reset)
   BEGIN
      IF reset = '1' THEN
         state <= s0;
      ELSIF (clk'EVENT AND clk = '1') THEN
      CASE state IS
     WHEN ...

An alterantive to that would be this:

ARCHITECTURE a OF state_machine IS
   TYPE STATE_TYPE IS (s0, s1, s2);
BEGIN
   PROCESS (clk, reset)
      VARIABLE state : STATE_TYPE := s0;
   BEGIN
      IF reset = '1' THEN
         state <= s0;
      ELSIF (clk'EVENT AND clk = '1') THEN
      CASE state IS
     WHEN ...

What are the pros (if any) and cons of doing it the alternative way? I have only seen the alternative in one place and I'm guessing there must be some good reason for that.

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1  
A variable for State works fine! One downside is that some simulators (Xilinx ISIM for example) don't plot variables in the wave window, making the state machine harder to debug. – Brian Drummond Sep 15 '13 at 20:50
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I like to keep local things local, so if the state information is needed only within the process, I use a variable. In that case, I also like to declare the state type inside the process:

ARCHITECTURE a OF state_machine IS
BEGIN
   PROCESS (clk, reset)
      TYPE STATE_TYPE IS (s0, s1, s2);
      VARIABLE state : STATE_TYPE := s0;
   BEGIN
      ...

In the rare cases where I need to access the state of an FSM from another process (e.g. interactive state machines), I'll use a signal for storing the state.

The signal vs. variable decision if often a matter of taste. Some developers think that variables are evil and will never use them. Others (like me) use them whenever they can to keep local things local. As a bonus, since variables are more lightweight objects than signals, they also simulate faster.

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Using a variable to hold state would mean you couldn't look at state with a waveform viewer.

There might be some synchronization issues with signal inputs used for branching, delta cycle mismatch in zero time models.

Any state machine outputs derived from state would require signals in any event - every concurrent statement has a process equivalent, a VHDL simulator executes processes, processes communicate via signals.

The only pluses that come to mind is that it would be a more compact model (code size) and execute a bit faster.

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1  
Modelsim allows you to see variables in the waveform viewer – Martin Thompson Sep 16 '13 at 12:25
    
@MartinThompson - viewing variables in a waveform viewer is only useful when the passage of simulation time is enforced by sensitivity/wait, in this case sensitivity to CLK. Implementing variables in a waveform display is easy, simple add the variable to the waveform capture process to which the process containing a variable assignment is sensitive. It's a small part of the use of variables and isn't universally supported. Checking the LRM glossary definitions for signal and variable shows the latter are not meant to convey history (as in a waveform displays). – user1155120 Sep 16 '13 at 22:19
    
If you're "using a variable to hold state", then it only makes sense to 'sample it' at clock edges, so I don't see the problem. If you want to see history (or more accurately "progression" in this case), use breakpoints and the debugger. – Martin Thompson Sep 17 '13 at 9:54

I often use a variable called state. It keeps the definition hidden, private to just the process that is using it. If you have 2 communicating state machines in one process, they can both have a variable called state local to themselves. Sometimes that works well. Other times it's confusing!

As with many code-style issues, you have to decide on the most readable way to do things. There's no functional reason not to use variables (of any sort, not just state variables).

One other thing you can do with a variable is read the intended next state at the end of the process, which can be useful when you need to reduce latency of outputs. Again, care is needed as you can create long chains of logic inadvertently which can slow the design down.

share|improve this answer
    
Processes communicating via signals can make things private using block statements or hierarchy keeping in mind it's a model's flat network that's simulated. The number of delta cycles incurred is a function of the sensitivity list or RHS signals. Using signals can incur as few as one additional sparse delta cycle if any. A drawback in making what could be two processes intercommunicate in one process through variables is that the burden of mutual exclusion falls to the code author. As you point out code quality is key, clever doesn't always imply 3rd party maintainability. – user1155120 Sep 16 '13 at 22:19

Variables are great if you are determining a partial sum or intermediate product that is to be used further down in your process in the same clock cycle. However if a variable is not driven every clock cycle then a latch will be inferred. Since you will want the state to be 'remembered' for the next clock cycle then you will get a latch if you use a variable without an assistant register signal. To clarify...

  signal state_sig : state_type;
begin

process(clk, rst)
  variable state : state_type := s0;
begin
  if rst = '1' then
    state_sig <= s0;
  elsif rising_edge(clk) then
    state := state_sig
    case state is 
     when s0 =>
      if blah = '0' then
       state := s1;
      end if;
     ....
     ....
    end case;
  if state = s1 then state := s2; end if;
  state_sig <= state;
 end if;
end process;

In the above example you are able to avoid going in the state s1 by modifying the state variable before it gets registered. A quick and dirty way of changing the state machine behaviour. However the state_sig signal must be used to 'remember' the state to avoid latch inferral.

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"However if a variable is not driven every clock cycle then a latch will be inferred." This is not correct! If a variable is used in a proper synchronous process (like in this example), no latches will be inferred. If you don't assign a new value, the value of your register will stay the same. Please type up some code and run it through your favorite synthesis tool. – Philippe Aug 1 '14 at 9:44
    
@Philippe Sorry, maybe I didn't write very clearly, but the code I wrote demonstrates how to avoid a latch, i.e. by using an assistant register. If you have no register, as in the original users question then the variable alone would cause a latch to be inferred. This is why I wrote "If you use a latch without an assistant register signal" you will get a latch. Sorry for lack of clarity. – John Harrison Aug 1 '14 at 14:59

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