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I am able to run the program alright. But the output is not clear and somehow I feel, I haven't utilized 2D arrays properly.

The program is supposed to generate voltage (between -1 and -25), display (critical if its more than -10).. plus print them for 3 hours.

i.e. 1 hour would have 10 rows, second hour would have 10 rows and third as well.

Need help to sort out the printing and utilized the 2D array. thanks,

//////////////////////////////////

using namespace std;
int getLowVoltage(int Min, int Max) //function to generate random voltage
{
    return ((float(rand()) / float(RAND_MAX)) * (Max - Min)) + Min;
}

int main()
{
    int minimum = -1;
    int maximum = -25;

    int hours[10][3] = {getLowVoltage(minimum,maximum)};

    for (int x = 1; x < 4; x++)
    {
        cout << "\n Hour -  " << x << endl;


        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            if (getLowVoltage(minimum, maximum) < -10)
            {
                cout << "\n" << getLowVoltage(minimum, maximum) << setprecision(2) << "--critical drop";
            }

            else
                 cout << "\n" << getLowVoltage(minimum, maximum) << setprecision(2);

        }

    }
    return 0;

}
/////////////////////////////////
share|improve this question
    
Your hours array will have a random value in index [0][0] and the rest of the values will be 0. And in your actual loop, you are calling getLowVoltage once to compare the value, and once to print the value, but each time the returned value will be different. – Jonathan Potter Sep 15 '13 at 22:38
    
fixed the callign of getlowvoltage, calling it once now. – mani Sep 15 '13 at 22:48
for(size_t i = 0; i < 10; ++i){
  std::cout << hours[i][0] << "\t" << hours[i][1] << "\t" << hours[i][2] << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
somehting like this ? – mani Sep 15 '13 at 22:36
    
for (int x = 1; x < 4; x++) { cout << "Hour - 1 " << "\t" << "Hour - 2 " << "\t" << "Hour - 3" << endl; for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) { cout << hours[x][getLowVoltage(minimum, maximum)] << "\t" << hours[x][getLowVoltage(minimum, maximum)] << "\t" << hours[x][getLowVoltage(minimum, maximum)] << endl; if (getLowVoltage(minimum, maximum) < -10) { cout << "\n" << setprecision(2) << "--critical drop";} else cout << "\n" << setprecision(2); } } return 0; } – mani Sep 15 '13 at 22:40
    
why do you need an outer loop over x? – morph Sep 15 '13 at 22:43
    
how would i output voltage for three hours?. – mani Sep 15 '13 at 22:47
    
check my answer: hours[i][0] means, you print for i'th row zero element from that row... in other words the snippet I gave you at the top prints out a table... just try to compile it, run it and you'll see – morph Sep 15 '13 at 22:50

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