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I'm trying to execute via command line a code written in C. I tried gcc -o file file.c, but it did not work. I need to learn how to compile and execute a code using gcc and llvm without graphical interface. Furthermore when I compile the program I cannot find the executable file in Finder (there's no Developer folder in Library).

Thanks in advance.

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What does "it did not work" mean, exactly? Any errors or warnings? Was "file" produced in the current directory, or not? –  Kurt Revis Sep 16 '13 at 0:44
    
@KurtRevis It appears "gcc: command not found". –  user1286390 Sep 16 '13 at 0:45
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Did you install the Xcode command-line tools yet? –  Kurt Revis Sep 16 '13 at 0:48
    
@KurtRevis No, I'm installing now. Hope it works. –  user1286390 Sep 16 '13 at 0:52
    
@KurtRevis It appears "no input files" (with gcc), however the file is in Desktop. Furthermore, when I try using "llvm -o file file.c", it appears "llvm : command not found". –  user1286390 Sep 16 '13 at 1:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use xcrun tool:

#/usr/bin/xcrun cc -o file file.c

Note: if you have several Xcode versions you can chose with xcode-select and your command above will use compiler and the rest of the tools from the selected SDK.

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If file.c is in the Desktop directory: Did you change to that directory beforehand?

Usually Terminal.app starts in the home directory, e.g.: /Users/yourname

To get to the Desktop directory:

cd ~/Desktop

Then check if the source file is there:

ls -l file.c

Then try again to compile:

gcc -o file file.c

Check for any error messages. If no output is given everything is fine and there should be an executable which can be (surprise!) executed:

ls -l file
 ./file
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