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I define and use a 2 dimensional numpy array in the program main function. A function called within main then tries to modify the numpy array without success. The array is declared as global in the second function but I still get the following error:

NameError: global name 'name_of_the_array' is not defined.

I thought that you could read a variable from main within a function without calling it global but that if you modified it within the function you had to declare it global in the function. That is what I thought I did here but it doesn't seem to work. Just stating to use numpy so maybe it's something unique to numpy arrays? Appreciate any ideas.

Larry

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closed as off-topic by abarnert, Michael0x2a, tcaswell, askewchan, tiago Dec 16 '13 at 9:36

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions concerning problems with code you've written must describe the specific problem — and include valid code to reproduce it — in the question itself. See SSCCE.org for guidance." – abarnert, Michael0x2a, tcaswell, tiago
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
If you don't provide your source code we can only guess. Please provide SSCCE sscce.org –  zero323 Sep 16 '13 at 0:41
    
If you add source to your question, I'll +1 it. –  Bi Rico Sep 16 '13 at 3:09
    
Thanks for the responses. This was my first stack overflow question. I now see that the code would really be needed. While I'm still working on the global issue I passed the array as an argument to the function and got it to work that way. –  Larry Kizer Sep 17 '13 at 1:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I define and use a 2 dimensional numpy array in the program main function. A function called within main then tries to modify the numpy array without success. The array is declared as global in the second function but I still get the following error:

You have to declare it as global in the main function. Otherwise, you're just creating a local variable, not a global variable. And you can't access another function's local variables, with or without global; you can only access globals.

I thought that you could read a variable from main within a function without calling it global but that if you modified it within the function you had to declare it global in the function.

Close enough to true… but creating it counts as modifying it.


So, instead of this:

def sub():
    global name_of_array
    return name_of_array[0, 0]

def main():
    name_of_array = np.zeros((2, 2))
    sub()

… do this:

def sub():
    global name_of_array
    return name_of_array[0, 0]

def main():
    global name_of_array
    name_of_array = np.zeros((2, 2))
    sub()

However, there's a better solution: Just pass the array as an argument, instead of using a global:

def sub(name_of_array):
    return name_of_array[0, 0]

def main():
    name_of_array = np.zeros((2, 2))
    sub(name_of_array)

If you avoided this because you're coming from a language like C++ and afraid that this would waste a ton of time and memory copying the whole array, Python doesn't work that way. (In C++ terms, all variables are passed as if you were using reference parameters… although that terminology can be misleading in Python.)

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I tried adding global to main as well, as you suggest here. Unfortunately it didn't make any difference, I still got the same Name Error. However, I also tried passing the array as an argument to the sub function and that worked fine. Thanks. –  Larry Kizer Sep 17 '13 at 1:34
    
@LarryKizer: As zero323 said, as long as you don't show us your source code, we're only guessing at what you did wrong. If I guessed wrong, my fix probably won't work for you. Fortunately, the better alternative worked for you, so it doesn't matter… but if you don't want to rely on getting randomly lucky, you need to provide sufficient information in your questions. –  abarnert Sep 17 '13 at 1:45

Not really an answer, more of a comment, but I wanted to show my code. I tested what I guess to be your scenario, and it works for me. Maybe you can compare your code to mine and explain what's different?

#! /usr/bin/env python
import numpy as np

def arr_mod():
    print 'reshaping a'
    a.shape = (2,-1)

if __name__=='__main__':
    a = np.arange(10)
    print 'a initialized as'
    print a
    arr_mod()
    print 'a is now'
    print a

Runs as:

askewchan:~$ ./test.py
a initialized as
[0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9]
    ... reshaping a
a is now
[[0 1 2 3 4]
 [5 6 7 8 9]]
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1  
Appreciate your response. Believe that I understand your example and that is exactly how I expected mine to work. Basically don't see what is different in my case. However, I was able to get around it a different way. Passing the array as an argument to the function worked fine. Still looking at my code to try and understand why the global approach didn't work for me. –  Larry Kizer Sep 17 '13 at 1:42
    
@askewchan: The OP specifically mentioned a "main function". And putting that main code in a function, instead of at module level, would produce exactly the symptom he describes: a would no longer be a global. So I think that's what the difference is between his code and yours. –  abarnert Sep 17 '13 at 1:47
1  
Sorry I wasn't really clear. By '...program main function' I meant the main module. That is, there are only some imports (numpy, etc.) , the main program module itself and one function defined by a def. –  Larry Kizer Sep 17 '13 at 2:17

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