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I have a function in which a static map object is defined, but I found it seems to affect the following memory allocations such as new operator or malloc. The example code is as the following:

void foo()
{
    static map<string, int> word2idx;
    char * data = new char[100];
    delete[] data;
    word2idx = foo2();

}
map<string,int> foo2()
{
     map<string, int> word2idx;
     return word2idx;
}

Allocating a small chunck of memory failed due to the definition of the function static map object, but it will be ok if I remove that static variable out of the scope of the function foo to the global scope as shown below:

static map<string, int> word2idx;
void foo()
{
    char * data = new char[100];
    delete[] data;
    word2idx = foo2();

}
map<string,int> foo2()
{
     map<string, int> word2idx;
     return word2idx;
}

I guess in the first example, the function static variable had been allocated for memory for twice(the first time is initialization, the second time is the operator = of map), and that may be the cause of this memory allocation issue. But I can't assure that. Can anyone give out more reasonable explaination or some reference to this function static variable related issue?

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1  
What do you mean by it fails? It throws std::bad_alloc? –  GManNickG Sep 16 '13 at 2:43
    
Yes, it did throw out std::bad_alloc. –  speedmancs Sep 16 '13 at 2:58
    
C++11 or C++03? In C++03, word2idx = foo2(); would copy the contents of the map returned from foo2() to word2idx, which could cause (re)allocations. In C++11, it would move, which doesn't (shouldn't) do any allocations. –  dyp Sep 16 '13 at 3:40
    
Can't reproduce. Does the code you posted exhibit the error when you run just that code (plus the minimum necessary #includes and a main that just calls foo)? If not, you need to come up with an example that reproduces the issue. –  Tyler McHenry Sep 16 '13 at 3:43
    
With questions like this it is vital that you include compiler information (exact version, flags used). –  thelamb Sep 16 '13 at 7:49

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