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I am currently looking at the following code for using Pipes in C:

/*****************************************************************************
Excerpt from "Linux Programmer's Guide - Chapter 6"
(C)opyright 1994-1995, Scott Burkett
***************************************************************************** 
MODULE: pipe.c
*****************************************************************************/

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>

int main(void)
{
    int     fd[2], nbytes;
    pid_t   childpid;
    char    string[] = "Hello, world!\n";
    char    readbuffer[80];

    pipe(fd);

    if((childpid = fork()) == -1)
    {
            perror("fork");
            exit(1);
    }

    if(childpid == 0)
    {
            /* Child process closes up input side of pipe */
            close(fd[0]);

            /* Send "string" through the output side of pipe */
            write(fd[1], string, (strlen(string)+1));
            exit(0);
    }
    else
    {
            /* Parent process closes up output side of pipe */
            close(fd[1]);

            /* Read in a string from the pipe */
            nbytes = read(fd[0], readbuffer, sizeof(readbuffer));
            printf("Received string: %s", readbuffer);
    }

    return(0);
}

This code only works to transmit the string to the parent one time. I am now trying to send a second string to the parent. Doing a second write statement (and yes I created a string2):

write(fd[1], string, (strlen(string)+1));
write(fd[1], string2, (strlen(string2)+1));

What else do I need to do in order to get the parent to register a second write?

Thanks for your help

share|improve this question
1  
You need to include some means of identifying where a string ends other than EOF. (A sentinal value such a newline might do. A length prefix is another option.) Then you have to include code on the receiving side to identify where strings end. –  ikegami Sep 16 '13 at 3:33
    
How did the parent "register" the first write? What may have to change so the parent knows when the first write ends and another begins? –  WhozCraig Sep 16 '13 at 3:34
    
Since the writes are using strlen() + 1 as their size, there already is an end of string marker being sent over the pipe: the '\0' at the end of the string. The reader just needs to pay attention to the difference between nbytes and the length of the string it printed, and advance past the '\0' to find the next string. It may also have to read twice - there's no guarantee on whether or not the 2 writes are merged. –  Wumpus Q. Wumbley Sep 18 '13 at 21:04

1 Answer 1

At the risk of being obvious, try:

        /* Send "string" through the output side of pipe */
        write(fd[1], string, (strlen(string)+1));
        write(fd[1], string, (strlen(string)+1));
        // etc.
        exit(0);
     }
      else
     {
        /* Parent process closes up output side of pipe */
        close(fd[1]);

        /* Read in a string from the pipe */
        nbytes = read(fd[0], readbuffer, sizeof(readbuffer));
        printf("Received string: %s", readbuffer);

        nbytes = read(fd[0], readbuffer, sizeof(readbuffer));
        printf("Received string: %s", readbuffer);

        // etc.

That is, just write more strings AND more importantly read them as well!? But you are probably asking something else, so please clarify your question.

share|improve this answer
    
This is pretty much what I'm asking except the second write statement should be more like "write(fd[1], string2, (strlen(string2)+1)". Using the code you provided both print statements would print out the same string (string1) instead of string1 and string2 –  user132490 Sep 16 '13 at 3:59
    
@user132490, you are free to print whatever strings you like. I just used the same string twice as a symbolic example. –  JackCColeman Sep 16 '13 at 4:22
    
@JackCColerman well yes, but using the strings you provided does not demonstrate that the code does not actually work. It simply prints the first string twice instead of printing string1, then string 2. –  user132490 Sep 16 '13 at 17:16
    
@user132490, do your own work. –  JackCColeman Sep 16 '13 at 21:55

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