Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to convert bytes into binary, I have a couple of functions which will output the byte representation of a file. Does anybody know how to do this effeciently? I know of several code extensive methods but I'm curious to see the ideas people here come up with.

I have this function which create a byte dump file:

void bindump(char *infile, char *outfile, int line_length, int size) {

FILE *in, *out;
int c;
int i, j;
char patterns[256][9];

for (i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < 8; j++) {
        patterns[i][j] = ((i>>(7-j))&1)+'0';
    }
    patterns[i][8] = '\0';
}

if (line_length % 8 != 0)
    errx(1, "Line length %d is not a multiple of 8\n", line_length);
line_length /= 8;

if ((in = fopen(infile, "r")) == NULL)
    err(1, "could not open %s for reading", infile);
if ((out = fopen(outfile, "w")) == NULL)
    err(1, "could not open %s for writing", outfile);
i = 0;
while (1) {
    c = fgetc(in);
    if (feof(in)) break;
    if (ferror(in))
        err(1, "error reading from %s", infile);

    if (fputs(patterns[c], out) == EOF)
        err(1, "error writing to %s", outfile);

    if ((++i) % line_length == 0) {
        if (fputc('\n', out) == EOF)
            err(1, "error writing to %s", outfile);
    }
}

if (i % line_length != 0) {
    if (fputc('\n', out) == EOF)
        err(1, "error writing to %s", outfile);
    warn("file length not multiple of line length (%d bits)", line_length*8);
}

if (size != 0) {
    int remaining = size-i/line_length;
    if (remaining < 0)
        errx(1, "too long file, length is %d\n", i/line_length);
    if (remaining > 0) {
        for (i = 0; i < remaining; i++) {
            for (j = 0; j < line_length; j++)
                fputs("00000000", out);
            fputc('\n', out);
        }
    }
}

fclose(in);
fclose(out);
}

which is tested by function main:

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
int size;

if (argc < 4) {
    fprintf(stderr,
        "usage: %s INFILE OUTFILE LINE-LENGTH [SIZE]\n"
        "Writes each bit from INFILE as ASCII '1' or '0' in OUTFILE,\n"
        "with a newline after every LINE-LENGTH bits.\n",
        argv[0]);
    return 1;
}

size = (argc == 4) ? 0 : atoi(argv[4]);
bindump(argv[1], argv[2], atoi(argv[3]), size);
}

You need these header files to run this:

 #include <stdio.h>
 #include <err.h>
 #include <stdlib.h>

To compile this program you need gcc and the input file, output file, length of line, and size must be entered at the command line:

gcc main.c
./a [inputfile.txt] [outputfile.txt] [line length] [size]
share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Mitch Wheat, Nirk, Sebastian, Drew, sashkello Sep 17 '13 at 0:55

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer 1

You preformat the 256 possible bit patterns and then use those to generate the output for each byte that you read. That's a good technique; it will be close to as fast as it is reasonably possible to do the job.

The code at:

while (1) {
    c = fgetc(in);
    if (feof(in)) break;
    if (ferror(in))
        err(1, "error reading from %s", infile);
    ...

should be just:

while ((c = getc(in)) != EOF)
{
    ...

Your use of feof() and ferror() is not precisely wrong, but it is sub-optimal.

If it was my output, I'd have a space between each byte's worth of data:

if (fputc((++i % line_length == 0) ? '\n' : ' ', out) == EOF)
    err(1, "error writing to %s", outfile);

I wouldn't print a warning about the file not being a multiple of the line-length; you can have files that contain a prime number of bytes, and they're perfectly OK and not warning-worthy in my view.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.