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I am trying to take in Japanese characters for a little echo server I wrote. The problem is that when I get the characters from System.in (via anything, scanner, InputStream, you name it) They always come in as garbage. I even tried using the

message = new String(bufferedReader.readLine().getBytes("UTF8");  

in order to try to get the bytes to come in as Unicode.

When I print a message from the server ようこそ (welcome in japanese) it comes up fine, the problem only exists when taking user input.

The console is set up to use UTF8 in eclipse.

Here is a small test program I wrote to make sure it was the input from System.in

the input and output are

よ
よ

And here is the code

public class TestUnicode {

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException
{
    BufferedReader stdIn = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in, "UTF8"));
    String message = stdIn.readLine();
    System.out.println(message);
}

}

public class Client {

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException 
{
    Socket serverSocket = null;

    try
    {
        serverSocket = new Socket("192.168.1.127", 3000); //connect to myself at port 3000
    }
    catch(IOException e)
    {
        System.out.println(e);
        System.exit(1);
    }

    BufferedReader in = null;
    PrintStream out = null;     
    try //create in and out to write and read from echo
    {
        in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(serverSocket.getInputStream()));
        out = new PrintStream(serverSocket.getOutputStream(), true);
    }
    catch(IOException e)
    {
        serverSocket.close();
        System.out.println(e);
        System.exit(1);
    }

    String message = null;
    message = in.readLine();
    System.out.println(message); //print out the welcome message

    BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
    //create a new buffered reader from my input

    try
    {
        while(true)
        {
            message = bufferedReader.readLine();
            out.println(message); //send a line to the server
            if(message.equals("quit"))
            {
                System.out.println(in.readLine());
                break;
            }
            System.out.println(in.readLine()); //get it back and print it               
        }

        System.out.println("Quiting client...");
    }
    catch(IOException e)
    {
        in.close();
        out.close();
        serverSocket.close();
        System.out.println(e);
        System.exit(1);
    }

    in.close();
    out.close();
    serverSocket.close();
}
}
share|improve this question
    
Could you please run this program from a shell/command window and see the output. Please make sure that your command window has set up into UTF-8 mode (font wise). –  gyan Sep 16 '13 at 4:38

3 Answers 3

I presume you are using Windows.
The problem here is the fact, that DOS prompt uses completely different character encoding than UTF-8. In case of Japanese it would be Shift-JIS, so trying to read that out with UTF-8 InputStream will not work.

Fortunately, there is a hope. Instead of using System.in you could (and should) use System.console(). It will return an instance of Console class with the valid character encoding conversion in place. However, you must be aware that trying to debug this out of IDE (especially Eclipse) won't work, as it does not attach Console. Oops.

The corrected code (that I am sure to work, but I haven't tested it):

public class TestUnicode {

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException
{
Console console = System.console();
String message = console.readLine();
console.writer().println(message);
}

Please note that you need to use Console also to print messages out. Why? It's just because you need to convert character encoding both ways. The DOS prompt still remains in the legacy encoding, and there is no way to change that.

share|improve this answer
    
Trying to use console.writer() returns a null pointer exception, probobly because I'm running in eclipse, not in terminal. Windows console doesn't support unicode, but I can try cygwin for now –  Brandon Ross Pollack Sep 16 '13 at 14:03
    
@Brandon: Yes, there is no console.writer() in Eclipse. The only way is to run the app from terminal. Even if you want to use Cygwin, I would recommend using Console rather than System.in/System.out. –  Paweł Dyda Sep 16 '13 at 18:21

When you create your InputStreamReader, you should specify the charset to use:

new InputStreamReader(System.in, "UTF-8")

This also applies to your socket streams.

If you don't do that, then the default charset (encoding) will be used. You can also change the default by adding -Dfile.encoding=UTF-8 as a VM argument.

Regarding your test program, System.out.println also uses the default charset, so it can mess up your string even if it was read correctly. So unless you change the default charset, you can use something like this to print out the string:

final OutputStreamWriter w = new OutputStreamWriter(System.out, "UTF-8");
w.write(message);
w.flush();
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't work, I tried it before and just now, I get garbage before I even send it out to the server, it reads in trash and then sends that and it echos back –  Brandon Ross Pollack Sep 16 '13 at 4:38
    
Could you write a simple test program that just reads a string and prints it out? As the problem is not with the sockets. –  aditsu Sep 16 '13 at 4:41
    
The problem is that if I look in the debugger, it occurs when the message is read in, not when it is printing, so you may be right about that, but the issue is happening even before. Also my default charset is UTF-8 right now as per your suggestion –  Brandon Ross Pollack Sep 16 '13 at 5:02
    
The only way I get something that looks similar to the output you pasted is if I take the input string, convert it to bytes using UTF-8, convert it back to string using ISO-8859-1, then print it out as UTF-8. But I can't get it to do that using the code you provided. I'm not sure what's happening on your side... –  aditsu Sep 16 '13 at 5:19
    
Also try running the program from the command line as @gyan suggested. –  aditsu Sep 16 '13 at 5:22

I modified your class this way

public class TestUnicode {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        BufferedReader stdIn = null;
        try {
            stdIn = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in, "UTF-8"));
        } catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e1) {
            e1.printStackTrace();
        }
        String message = "";
        try {
            message = stdIn.readLine();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        try {
            System.out.println(new String(message.getBytes("UTF-8")));
        } catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

and run it in console and got the desired output.

So in your case, I'd suggest you place the character encoding part in your BufferedReader and PrintStream

Note: I tried running it using an IDE and outputs '?' for that Japanese character, I recommend running it in a console.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
This does generate a ? in console in eclipse, but if I change eclipse's display encoding to Unicode, it does not displaycorrectly, よ turns into よ, I am in windows, but if need be i can boot into Ubuntu to see if it works there. I just need to be sure I can get UTF8 input so when this app I am working on has a GUI it works... –  Brandon Ross Pollack Sep 16 '13 at 13:57

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