Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can someone tell me what is going wrong here?

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

#define ERROR 0
#define MAX_INPUT_LINE 80
#define print(x) {fputs(x,stdout);}
#define SUCCESS 1

int main (long argc, char *argv[])
{
   int mode;
   printf("1 for hexidecimal or 2 for binary");
   scanf("%d", mode);

   printf("\n\n\nThe value of mode is %d\n", mode);
   return 0;
}

When I enter 2 for binary, I get this:

The value of mode is 2665564

Obviously I should get 2, what am I doing wrong?? Is it my compiler, is it bevcause I am using Cygwin? Why is mode not 2??

share|improve this question
1  
What you do wrong is ignoring your compiler warning messages. –  jlliagre Sep 16 '13 at 21:15

9 Answers 9

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is C, not Java. When you use a function like scanf (...) since you cannot pass variables by reference, you are expected to pass a pointer to the variable that will hold the value.

Use the following instead:

scanf ("%d", &mode);

The use of (&) will pass the address-of mode, instead of implicitly casting mode to an (int *).

You are actually quite lucky in this example that this did not cause your program to crash. If mode had a value of 0 and was cast to a pointer in order to satisfy this function, you could well wind up dereferencing a NULL pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't believe I didn't realize this, thank you –  mosawi Sep 16 '13 at 7:47

your scanf is wrong. should be:

scanf("%d", &mode);

The & tells the compiler to send scanf a pointer to mode (i.e. its address) and not the actual value of mode. That way scanf can put update mode with the new scanned value.

share|improve this answer

scanf is accepting pointers and then trying to put the value int the location the pointer is pointing at, meaning you can't send mode you need to send &mode. sending mode will cause Undefined Behavior.

do

scanf ("%d", &mode);

your full code:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

#define ERROR 0
#define MAX_INPUT_LINE 80
#define print(x) {fputs(x,stdout);}
#define SUCCESS 1

int main (long argc, char *argv[])
{
   int mode;
   printf("1 for hexidecimal or 2 for binary");
   scanf("%d", &mode);

   printf("\n\n\nThe value of mode is %d\n", mode);
   return 0;
}

i would also state the if you want to print a number in hex mode use the %x:

printf("%x", mode);
share|improve this answer

You're using scanf wrong. For things like integer values, floating point values or characters, you need to provide a pointer to the variable to be filled. That's done most easily with the address-of operator &, like

scanf("%d", &mode);

The scanf family of functions also needs a pointer when reading a string, but since string already are pointers (or arrays which decays to pointers) you don't need the address-of operator for strings.

I suggest you read this scanf reference, as it contains a table showing what argument the different formatting codes expect.

share|improve this answer

The second parameter of scanf is wrong, it expects a pointer to an int since the format is %d.

scanf("%d", &mode);
//          ^
share|improve this answer

scanf's additional parameters is a address. Reference here.

By the way, the additional arguments should point to already allocated objects of the type specified by their corresponding format specifier within the format string.

So just change the 3rd line in main() to:

scanf("%d", &mode);
share|improve this answer

the scanf prototype is int scanf(const char *format, ...); hence use '&' to send the address...

share|improve this answer
    
This does not actually explain why you need to use the address of operator. Plenty of functions use ... (variable-length argument lists) that do not require/expect pointers. The reason scanf needs a pointer is because it uses the variable-length arguments to store the parsed values. –  Andon M. Coleman Sep 16 '13 at 8:02
    
Thanks for correcting. i was in hurry and wanted to tell to use address of operator in the code but didn't frame my answer in a good way. –  Trilok M Sep 16 '13 at 9:49

You are lucky enough for your program not to crash with a memory fault. As mode is not initialized, its value is undefined so you are storing an integer at a random address.

Later, you print that address in decimal.

This should "work" (if accepted by the compiler):

printf("%d\n",*mode);

or

printf("%d\n",*(int*)mode);

To clarify, I obviously do not recommend to dereference an uninitialized pointer. I'm just trying to explain why the program didn't crash and show how to get the entered value with keeping the bogus scanf as is (unlike all other replies which rightly fix the root cause). On a 32 bit environment, an int and a pointer are both stored in 4 bytes so are indistinguishable by the CPU. Of course the compiler should at least output a warning with such bogus code.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think dereferencing uninitialized pointer is a good tip. For anyone. And since it's not even a pointer, it is so much worse idea. –  zubergu Sep 16 '13 at 7:42
    
@NathanFellman mode value doesn't change, it is used as the address where to store the integer. –  jlliagre Sep 16 '13 at 7:43
    
@zubergu I fully agree, that's why I wrote "work". –  jlliagre Sep 16 '13 at 7:44

Your code should be like this:

scanf("%d", &mode);

you have missed the & symbol in your code.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.