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How could I implement this? I think my solution is very dirty, and I would like to do it better. I think there is an easy way to do this in Ruby, but I can't remember. I want to use it with Rails, so if Rails provides something similar that's ok, too. usage should be like this:

fruits = ['banana', 'strawberry', 'kiwi', 'orange', 'grapefruit', 'lemon', 'melon']

# odd_fruits should contain all elements with odd indices (index % 2 == 0)
odd_fruits = array_mod(fruits, :mod => 2, :offset => 0)

# even_fruits should contain all elements with even indices (index % 2 == 1)
even_fruits = array_mod(fruits, :mod => 2, :offset => 1)

puts odd_fruits
  banana
  kiwi
  grapefruit
  melon

puts even_fruits
  strawberry
  orange
  lemon

*** EDIT ***

for those wo want to know, that is what i finally did:

in a rails project, i created a new file config/initializers/columnize.rb which looks like this:

class Array
  def columnize args = { :columns => 1, :offset => 0 }
    column = []
    self.each_index do |i|
      column << self[i] if i % args[:columns] == args[:offset]
    end
    column
  end
end

Rails automatically loads these files immediately after Rails has been loaded. I also used the railsy way of supplying arguments to a method, because i think that serves the purpose of better readable code, and i'm a good-readable-code-fetishist :) I extended the core class "Array", and now i can do things like the following with every array in my project:

>> arr = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]
=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]

>> arr.columnize :columns => 2, :offset => 0
=> [1, 3, 5, 7]
>> arr.columnize :columns => 2, :offset => 1
=> [2, 4, 6, 8]

>> arr.columnize :columns => 3, :offset => 0
=> [1, 4, 7]
>> arr.columnize :columns => 3, :offset => 1
=> [2, 5, 8]
>> arr.columnize :columns => 3, :offset => 2
=> [3, 6]

I will now use it to display entries from the database in different columns in my views. What i like about it, is that i don't have to call any compact methods or stuff, because rails complains when you pass a nil object to a view. now it just works. I also thought about letting JS do all that for me, but i like it better this way, working with the 960 Grid system (http://960.gs)

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8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted
fruits = ["a","b","c","d"]
even = []
x = 2 
fruits.each_index{|index|
    even << fruits[index] if index % x == 0
}
odds = fruits - even
p fruits
p even
p odds



["a", "b", "c", "d"]
["a", "c"]
["b", "d"]
share|improve this answer
    
that is exactly what i was looking for :) thanks mate! –  p11y Dec 12 '09 at 12:03
    
odds = fruits - even this is the kind of stuff I love about ruby –  Steph Rose Nov 16 '11 at 14:48
def array_mod(arr, mod, offset = 0)
  arr.shift(offset)
  out_arr = []

  arr.each_with_index do |val, idx|
    out_arr << val if idx % mod == 0
  end

  out_arr
end

Usage:

>> fruits = ['banana', 'strawberry', 'kiwi', 'orange', 'grapefruit', 'lemon', 'melon']

>> odd_fruits = array_mod(fruits, 2)
=> ["banana", "kiwi", "grapefruit", "melon"]

>> even_fruits = array_mod(fruits, 2, 1)
=> ["strawberry", "orange", "lemon"]

>> even_odder_fruits = array_mod(fruits, 3, 2)
=> ["kiwi", "lemon"]
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I tried to find a more functional way to do this (e.g. Array#select), but was thwarted since most of Ruby's functional Array methods don't expose the index. –  Jordan Dec 10 '09 at 17:02

What you want is:

even_fruits  = fruits.select_with_index { |v,i| i % 2 == 0) }
odd_fruits = fruits - even_fruits

Unfortunately Enumerable#select_with_index does not exist as standard, but several people have extended Enumerable with such a method.

http://snippets.dzone.com/posts/show/3746 http://webget.com/gems/webget_ruby_ramp/doc/Enumerable.html#M000058

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+1 Of course!, you don't need the value if you cat get it with fruits[i] then using each_index will do –  OscarRyz Dec 10 '09 at 17:16
    
But using the one you point to, your block would have to be i % 2 == 0, not just i % 2, which would always be true... –  glenn mcdonald Dec 11 '09 at 2:39
    
silly me, of course zero evaluates as true! cheers glenn! ;) –  Steve Graham Dec 11 '09 at 3:22

The simplest method I can think of is this:

fruits = ["a","b","c","d"]
evens = fruits.select {|x| fruits.index(x) % 2 == 0}
odds = fruits - evens

You don't need to mess with select_with_index if the array can look up indices for you. I suppose the drawback to this method is if you have multiple entries in 'fruits' with the same value (the index method returns the index of the first matching entry only).

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Now that I think about it, the drawback I mentioned above isn't really an issue since the - operator for arrays shares a similar problem with multiple identical elements (meaning using index isn't adding any new problems). –  bta Dec 10 '09 at 18:38
    
This could be very slow for a large dataset since Array#index is a linear-time operation. –  ScottJ Dec 10 '09 at 19:20

Solution using just core capabilities:

(0...((fruits.size+1-offset)/mod)).map {|i| fruits[i*mod+offset]}
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Oh, I like this. –  Jordan Dec 10 '09 at 19:49
    
extra curly brace on the end :) –  Steve Graham Dec 11 '09 at 3:25
    
Oops. Fixed, thanks. –  glenn mcdonald Dec 11 '09 at 16:46

Rails provides an ActiveSupport extension to Array that provides an "in_groups_of" method. That's what I usually use for things like this. It allows you to do this:

to pull the even fruits (remember to compact to pull off nils at the end):

fruits = ['banana', 'strawberry', 'kiwi', 'orange', 'grapefruit', 'lemon', 'melon']
fruits.in_groups_of(2).collect{|g| g[1]}.compact
=> ["strawberry", "orange", "lemon"]

to pull the odd fruits:

fruits.in_groups_of(2).collect{|g| g[0]}.compact
=> ["banana", "kiwi", "grapefruit", "melon"]

to get every third fruit, you could use:

fruits.in_groups_of(3).collect{|g| g[0]}.compact
=> ["banana", "orange", "melon"]
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functional way

#fruits = [...]
even = []
odd = []

fruits.inject(true ){|_is_even, _el| even << _el if _is_even; !_is_even}
fruits.inject(false){|_is_odd,  _el| odd  << _el if _is_odd;  !_is_odd }
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Here's a solution using #enum_for, which allows you to specify a method to use "in place" of #each:

require 'enumerator'
mod = 2
[1, 2, 3, 4].enum_for(:each_with_index).select do |item, index| 
  index % mod == 0 
end.map { |item, index| item }
# => [1, 2]
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