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Actually, I want to access properties of a base class in a method and I am not instantiating that object directly. Below is code, I am working on:

  public class Test {
    public static void Main( ) {
      drivedclass obj = new drivedclass( );
      obj.DoSomething( );
    }
  }


  public class drivedclass : baseclass {
    public void DoSomething( ) {
      LoadSomeThing( );
    }
  }

  public class baseclass {
    public string property1 {
      get;
      set;
    }
    public string property2 {
      get;
      set;
    }
    public void LoadSomeThing( ) {
      //here I want to access values of all properties
    }
  }

I would like to know if there is a way, I can access the properties in method of same class and that class is base class.

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Question is really unclear at the moment –  Sriram Sakthivel Sep 16 '13 at 9:24
    
Just try it and you will have a bunch of info. –  Hamlet Hakobyan Sep 16 '13 at 9:24

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can access them with reflection, but this is not the 'normal' way.

foreach(PropertyInfo prop in this.GetType().GetProperties())
{
    prop.SetValue(this, newValue);
}

If you want to make it 'cleaner', you should make the properties virtual.

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Glad you added the note that it's not the normal way :) I have a feeling that OP is just learning the principles of inheritance and that reflection is not really what they're looking for. –  Zoltán Sep 16 '13 at 9:27
1  
You're suggesting reflection for a class to access it's own public properties? –  Rotem Sep 16 '13 at 9:27
    
@Rotem why not?, I only showed it can be done with reflection, but i would be better to implement it without reflection. If he is making something like a serialization that will also write properties of derived-classes. It can be done this way. Otherwise, he should rethink his object model. He should implement virtual/abstract properties. –  Jeroen van Langen Sep 16 '13 at 9:31
    
@JeroenvanLangen Read the question again :) You're suggesting reflection for an object to access its OWN properties. –  Rotem Sep 16 '13 at 9:33
    
@Rotem good notice :), some people interpret ' //here I want to access values of all properties ' as all properties including the derived class properties. :) –  Jeroen van Langen Sep 16 '13 at 9:35

You can just use property1 and property2 as they are.

However, note that in LoadSomeThing() you will not be able to access any properties of drivedlcass, because base classes cannot see properties of their derived classes by definition.

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Use the following method to enumerate all property values:

        public void EnumerateProperties()
    {
        var propertiesInfo = this.GetType().GetProperties();
        foreach (var propertyInfo in propertiesInfo)
        {
            var val = propertyInfo.GetValue(this, null);
        }
    }
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2  
You're suggesting reflection for a class to access it's own public properties? –  Rotem Sep 16 '13 at 9:27
    
@Rotem: Is not got to use reflection for accessing public properties? –  User1551892 Sep 16 '13 at 9:40
    
It was unclear from your question that you want to enumerate all class properties. –  Rotem Sep 16 '13 at 9:58

Question is quiet unclear but if you wish to access your properties, they are well present in both the Base class and the derived class. thus, if you do s = obj.property2 in your main class Test, that should be available.

public class Test {
    public static void Main( ) {
      drivedclass obj = new drivedclass( );
      obj.DoSomething( );
      string s = obj.property2 ;
    }
  }
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If I understand correctly you'd like to access base class property when you create insatnce of derived class.

Nothing is stopping you from doing this.

drivedclass obj = new drivedclass( );
obj.property1 = "Something";
obj.DoSomething( );

public void LoadSomeThing( ) 
{
   //you can use this.property1 here
}
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You could always make it explicit:

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public string Property3
    { get; set; }

    public void DoSomething ()
    {
        LoadSomeThing();
    }

    public override void LoadSomeThing ()
    {
        base.LoadSomeThing();
        Console.WriteLine(Property3);
    }
}

public class BaseClass {
    public string Property1
    { get; set; }
    public string Property2
    { get; set; }

    public virtual void LoadSomeThing()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(Property1);
        Console.WriteLine(Property2);
    }
}
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You can simply try: this.property1

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