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I have an list of integers and an input x. I have to find if there are any two numbers in my list such that the sum of their square equals to x.

I have done this using:

def findsquare(n1, n2, inp):
    result = n1*n1 + n2*n2

    if result == inp:
        return True

a = [2, -4, 6, 3, 9, 0 , -1, -9]

x = 45

i = 0
while i < (len(a)-1):
    res = findsquare(a[i], a[i+1], x)

    if res:
        print "Match: " + str(a[i]) + ", " + str(a[i+1])

    else:
        print "No Match: " + str(a[i]) + ", " + str(a[i+1])

    i = i+1

The problem with this is the element is only compared to it's next element. For example: 2 and -4 are compared, -4 and 6 are compared. What I want do it compare 2 with every elements there is on the list, compare -4 with every other elements on the list and so on. I would like to do this without using built in function in python.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You just need to keep track of two indexes, because you are going through the list multiple times. If i tracks the first element of your comparison, you need to have another j which tracks the second element in your comparison. Now j can be any other index of the list, but if you want to do every comparison only once, you can start at i+1:

for i in range(len(a)):
    for j in range(i + 1, len(a)):
        # compare the elements here
        print(a[i], a[j])
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Yeah, this is it. Thanks man. Appreciate it! –  pynovice Sep 16 '13 at 9:46

Use itertools.combination to generate all pairs, e.g.

import itertools

a = [2, -4, 6, 3, 9, 0 , -1, -9]

for i in itertools.combinations(a, 2):
    print i

output:

(2, -4)
(2, 6)
(2, 3)
(2, 9)
(2, 0)
(2, -1)
(2, -9)
(-4, 6)
(-4, 3)
(-4, 9)
(-4, 0)
(-4, -1)
(-4, -9)
...

The itertools.combination is equivalent to:

def combinations(iterable, r):
    # combinations('ABCD', 2) --> AB AC AD BC BD CD
    # combinations(range(4), 3) --> 012 013 023 123
    pool = tuple(iterable)
    n = len(pool)
    if r > n:
        return
    indices = range(r)
    yield tuple(pool[i] for i in indices)
    while True:
        for i in reversed(range(r)):
            if indices[i] != i + n - r:
                break
        else:
            return
        indices[i] += 1
        for j in range(i+1, r):
            indices[j] = indices[j-1] + 1
        yield tuple(pool[i] for i in indices)
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I happened to be using these when I saw your question:

def choose_two (L):
    for i in xrange(len(L)):
        for ii in xrange(i+1,len(L)):
            yield (L[i],L[ii]) 

def xprod (L1,L2):
    for l in L1:
        for l2 in L2:
            yield (l,l2)

The latter is the cross product, while the former yields all possible pairs. So you would do:

a = [2, -4, 6, 3, 9, 0 , -1, -9]

x = 45

is_in = x in [a1**2+a2**2 for (a1,a2) in choose_two(a)]
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>>> a=[2,1,2,5,6,7,8]
>>> x=9

def check(a,x):
...     for p,v in enumerate(a):
...             for k in range(p+1,len(a)):
...                     val=v+a[k]
...                     if val==x:
...                             print 'matched',v,a[k],x
check(a,x)
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