Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I recently try migrating from MySQL Full Text Search to ElasticSearch, and I'm a little bit confused with translating some queries.

I have this query.

 "SELECT * FROM Books WHERE MATCH (description) AGAINST ('+Harry +Potter' IN BOOLEAN MODE)"

It means both "Harry" and "Potter" must shown in the description column, regardless the order or the position. (For the sake of example, please assume "Harry" and "Potter" can be independent from each other.)

I tried this using ElasticSearch

{
    "query": {
        "query_string": {
            "query": "Harry Potter",
            "fields": ["description"]
        }
    }
}

but it's still give some result that only contains "Harry" or "Potter".

I tried this one also,

{
    "query": {
        "bool": {
           "must" : {
               "term" : { "description" : "Harry Potter" }
           }
        }
    }
}

this one returns all result contains "Harry Potter", not "Harry Bla Bla Bla Potter" and "Potter Bla Bla Bla Harry".

What is the simplest (or perhaps also fastest) ElasticSearch query that returns the same result with the MySQL query above.

UPDATE

I just found something like this

{
    "query": {
        "match" : {
            "description" : {
                "query" : "Harry Potter",
                "operator" : "and"
            }
         }
    }
}

the result seems about right. But is there other way that is more common?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You either need to set the default operator to AND like you already found or or use the

+Harry +Potter 

syntax you also used for MySQL in a query_string query.

ElasticSearch uses OR by default, so that's why your query_string query for "Harry Potter" returned results that contain only one of the words.

Term queries only match if the index contains the exact term you put in the term query, and since the string "Harry Potter" doesn't match "Harry blabla Potter" you didn't get a match.

If you want another way you could use the boolean query you had and make it contain two separate must clauses, one for "Harry" and one for "Potter" but that might not be needed in this case.

share|improve this answer

Some more info for Vis' answer

If you want "Harry Potter" also match "Harry blabla Potter", you can adjust phrase_slop of query_string to somethings > 0, this is the allowed distance between matched terms: - default to 0 mean that exact phrase matches are required, no other terms between search phases - set to 1 mean allow 1 term between it, so "Harry blalal Potter" will matched, but "Harry blabla bloblo Potter" will not. - ...

share|improve this answer
    
awesome! thanks a lot! –  Petra Barus Sep 20 '13 at 9:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.