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I have a parallel for in a C++ program that has to loop up to some number of iterations. Each iteration computes a possible solution for an algorithm, and I want to exit the loop once I find a valid one (it is ok if a few extra iterations are done). I know the number of iterations should be fixed from the beginning in the parallel for, but since I'm not increasing the number of iterations in the following code, is there any guarantee of that threads check the condition before proceeding with their current iteration?

void fun()
{
  int max_its = 100;

  #pragma omp parallel for schedule(dynamic, 1)
  for(int t = 0; t < max_its; ++t)
  {
    ...
    if(some condition)
      max_its = t; // valid to make threads exit the for?
  }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't modify max_its as the standard says it must be a loop invariant expression.

What you can do, though, is using a boolean shared variable as a flag:

void fun()
{
  int max_its = 100;
  bool found = false;
  #pragma omp parallel for schedule(dynamic, 1) shared(found)
  for(int t = 0; t < max_its; ++t)
  {
    if( ! found ) {
    ...
    }
    if(some condition) {
  #pragma omp atomic
      found = true; // valid to make threads exit the for?
    }
  }
}

A logic of this kind may be also implemented with tasks instead of a work-sharing construct. A sketch of the code would be something like the following:

void algorithm(int t, bool& found) {
#pragma omp task shared(found)
{
  if( !found ) {
    // Do work
    if ( /* conditionc*/ ) {
      #pragma omp atomic
      found = true
    }
  }
} // task
} // function


void fun()
{
  int max_its = 100;
  bool found  = false;
  #pragma omp parallel 
  {
    #pragma omp single
    {
      for(int t = 0; t < max_its; ++t)
      {
        algorithm(t,found);
      }
    } // single
  } // parallel
}

The idea is that a single thread creates max_its tasks. Each task will be assigned to a waiting thread. If some of the tasks find a valid solution, then all the others will be informed by the shared variable found.

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In this case, all the threads do all their iterations, but they simply check at the beginning if they must do something at that moment, no? –  ChronoTrigger Sep 16 '13 at 10:51
1  
No. Only one thread will do all iterations creating tasks for other threads to consume. The scheduler (implementation-dependant) decides how to map tasks to threads such that it keeps them busy most the time. –  H.Josef Sep 16 '13 at 11:13
    
I think that found = true is atomic (because it is a simple assignment) with no need of the omp directive. –  ChronoTrigger Sep 16 '13 at 13:19
    
The OpenMP directive is needed to avoid a concurrent write, even if it is a "simple assignment" :-) –  Massimiliano Sep 16 '13 at 13:33
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Modifying the loop counter works for most implementations of OpenMP worksharing constructs, but the program will no longer be conforming to OpenMP and there is no guarantee that the program works with other compilers.

Since the OP is OK with some extra iterations, OpenMP cancellation will be the way to go. OpenMP 4.0 introduced the "cancel" construct exactly for this purpose. It will request termination of the worksharing construct and teleport the threads to the end of it.

void fun()
{
  int max_its = 100;

#pragma omp parallel for schedule(dynamic, 1)
  for(int t = 0; t < max_its; ++t)
  {
    ...
    if(some condition) {
#pragma omp cancel for
    }
#pragma omp cancellation point for
  }
}

Be aware that might there might be a price to pay in terms of performance, but you might want to accept this if the overall performance is better when aborting the loop.

In pre-4.0 implementations of OpenMP, the only OpenMP-compliant solution would be to have an if statement to approach the regular end of the loop as quickly as possible without execution the actual loop body:

void fun()
{
  int max_its = 100;

#pragma omp parallel for schedule(dynamic, 1)
  for(int t = 0; t < max_its; ++t)
  {
    if(!some condition) {
      ... loop body ...
    }
  }
}

Hope that helps!

Cheers, -michael

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Thanks a lot for the hint on OpenMP 4. –  ChronoTrigger Sep 16 '13 at 22:09
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If some_condition is a logical expression that is "always valid", then you could do:

for(int t = 0; t < max_its && !some_condition; ++t)

That way, it's very clear that !some_condition is required to continue the loop, and there is no need to read the rest of the code to find out that "if some_condition, loop ends"

Otherwise (for example if some_condition is the result of some calculation inside the loop and it's complicated to "move" the some_condition to the for-loop condition, then using break is clearly the right thing to do.

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I can't use that "complex" condition in the parallel for, as far as I know. gcc tells me "error: invalid controlling predicate". –  ChronoTrigger Sep 16 '13 at 10:19
    
Oh, how limiting and irritating. Are you sure changing the t = max_its works then either? –  Mats Petersson Sep 16 '13 at 10:24
1  
OpenMP imposes restrictions on what you can do within the for loop condition. What you suggest is not valid for a loop sharing construct. –  Massimiliano Sep 16 '13 at 10:25
    
@Mats, no, I'm not sure, that is what I would like to find out with my question. –  ChronoTrigger Sep 16 '13 at 10:29
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