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I would like to make my scatterplot circles shaded according to the value in one column.

"value"; "avg.sal"; "avg.temp"
2,5698; 34,27254; 4,44
5,4361; 34,30686; 4,64
2,27; 34,3538; 8,05
5,6015; 34,50136; 5,01
2,27; 34,37596; 7,4

I have my plot ready with salinity on the y-axis and temperature on the x-axis.

plot(df$avg.sal, df$avg.temp)

How do I shade the circles (e.g. from light blue to dark blue) according to the column "value"? The values have a big range but smaller values (e.g. 2) should be light blue and larger values (e.g. 10) should be dark blue. I would prefer not to use GGplot.

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You can use the colorRampPalette, see this post: stackoverflow.com/questions/13353213/… –  user1981275 Sep 16 '13 at 12:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
dat <- read.delim(text='"value"; "avg.sal"; "avg.temp"
 2,5698; 34,27254; 4,44
 5,4361; 34,30686; 4,64
 2,27; 34,3538; 8,05
 5,6015; 34,50136; 5,01
 2,27; 34,37596; 7,4"', sep=";", dec=",")

bluefunc <- colorRampPalette(c("lightblue", "darkblue"))
plot( dat$avg.sal, dat$avg.temp, 
              col=bluefunc(5)[findInterval(dat$value, seq(2:6))] )

To respond to the followup question. When cex is specified inside a vector it does control size of the "points":

dat$size <- 1:5
bluefunc <- colorRampPalette(c("lightblue", "darkblue"))
plot( dat$avg.sal,  dat$avg.temp,
            cex=dat$size,
            col=bluefunc(5)[findInterval(dat$value, seq(2:6))] )
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thanks for the reply @DWin! I was also thinking if it is possible to at the same time make the circles bigger... for the colour it is possible to say 5 shades and specify the interval as above... could you also do the same for size of circles (e.g. light blue small circles and dark blue big cicles)? i saw this post link and link but using symbols instead of the plot function does not help me. –  Bala Sep 17 '13 at 7:25
    
Perhaps you were not offering a size-argument-vector to the that varied according to your desires? The symbols function does accept size vectors for 'circles', 'squares', 'rectangles', 'stars', and 'thermometers'. –  BondedDust Sep 17 '13 at 15:42
    
sorry, i should rephrase my question a little bit.... from the dat file, rows 3 and 5 should be the lightest blue and smallest circles (but the same blue and same size because their value =2.27), next is row 1 (value=2.5698) a bit darker blue and a bit bigger circle, next row 2 (value=5.4) and lastly is row 4 (value=5.6) with the darkest blue and biggest circle... –  Bala Sep 18 '13 at 8:12
    
If you wanted the size to follow the increase in "darkness" then just offer the same numeric argument to size that you are offering to the colorRamp function: cex=findInterval(dat$value, seq(2:6)) –  BondedDust Sep 18 '13 at 14:59
    
what if my value was much larger... say until 240... then is it possible to have values 0-20 as the lightest shade of blue, then 21-40.. 41-60... until 221-240 with the darkest shade of blue... This would mean bluefunc(12)... Thank you! –  Bala Sep 23 '13 at 14:28

I looked for a good function in the net but didn't find one that was satisfactory...
findInterval() does not work quite well when length(x) is small.
So check this function. I think its a little better than the one that whas posted before. Still it doesn't work well with a small number of values like in your example.

color.gradient <- function(x, colors=c("red","yellow","green")) {
  # Create Color Gradient for a given vector x with given colors.
  #
  # The function creates a color function with colorRampPalette().
  # Then it hands over the number of unique elements of x into this function()().
  # From the result of the function()()[ ] only these elements are picked which are most similar to the values in the sequence min(x) to max(x)
  # If length(unique(x)) is relatively small (<15) it is done in a computation intensive matter in order to to achieve better results.
  # Else it is done with findInterval() which is much faster.
  # Example found in the internet: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/18827214/one-colour-gradient-according-to-value-in-column-scatterplot-in-r

  lux <- length(unique(x))
  if(lux<15){
    lx <- length(x)
    choose <- apply(  
      abs( matrix( rep(x,lux),ncol=lx,byrow=TRUE) - 
             matrix( rep(seq(min(x),max(x), length.out=lux),lx), ncol=lx ) ) ,
      2, function(x)which(x==min(x))[1] )
    return( colorRampPalette(colors) (lux) [ choose ] )
  } else {
    return( colorRampPalette(colors) (lux) [ findInterval(x, seq(min(x),max(x), length.out=lux)) ] )  
  }
}

dat <- read.delim(text='"value"; "avg.sal"; "avg.temp"
 2,5698; 34,27254; 4,44
 5,4361; 34,30686; 4,64
 2,27; 34,3538; 8,05
 5,6015; 34,50136; 5,01
 2,27; 34,37596; 7,4"', sep=";", dec=",")
x <- dat[,"value"]; length(unique(x))
plot(rep(1, length(x)), y=x, col=color.gradient(x), pch=19,cex=3)
x <- c(x, 10); length(unique(x))
plot(rep(1, length(x)), y=x, col=color.gradient(x), pch=19,cex=3)
x <- c(x, 10 , 20); length(unique(x))
plot(rep(1, length(x)), y=x, col=color.gradient(x), pch=19,cex=3)
x <- c(1,1,1,1,1,1.2,2,2.2,5,6.5,8,8.6,10,10); length(unique(x))
plot(rep(1, length(x)), y=x, col=color.gradient(x), pch=19,cex=3)
x <- c(1,1,1.1,1.2,1,1.3,2,2.2,5,5.1,5.2,5.3,5.4,6.5,8,8.6,10,10); length(unique(x))
plot(rep(1, length(x)), y=x, col=color.gradient(x), pch=19,cex=3)
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