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I've been building a development environment in Java (as a small research project). As part of that, I built a custom text component that draws the text itself using Graphics2d like so:

g2.drawString("some text", 100, 100);

Everything worked fine developing things in Eclipse using 1.6 (I assume this is provided by Apple), until I packaged everything up and ran in java 1.7 (provided by Oracle). Obviously in development environments fonts are pretty important, so I was displeased to see the results in 1.7.

enter image description here

I have tried packaging custom fonts, but they all appear grainy and eroded. The comparison above isn't too bad, but some fonts (like Monaco) look terrible.

I'm guessing this is to do with how Apple hooks things into Quartz. But is there any way to improve things so it doesn't look terrible on other systems? Does anyone have a strategy for this?

Update: This is the comparison in Monaco: enter image description here

and a zoomed comparison of the C (in paintComponent) in Monaco (1.7 on left, 1.6 on right). Note that I am loading the font from a local ttf file using:

GraphicsEnvironment ge = GraphicsEnvironment.getLocalGraphicsEnvironment();
InputStream is = Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader().getResourceAsStream("monaco.ttf");
Font customFont = null;
try
{
customFont = Font.createFont(Font.TRUETYPE_FONT, is);
customFont = customFont.deriveFont(16.0f).deriveFont(Font.BOLD);
                    is.close();
                    ge.registerFont(customFont);
                } catch (FontFormatException e1)
                {
                    e1.printStackTrace();
                } catch (IOException e1)
                {
                    e1.printStackTrace();
                }
this.setFont(customFont);

enter image description here

Note also that anti aliasing is turned on using:

 g2.setRenderingHint(RenderingHints.KEY_ANTIALIASING, 
                    RenderingHints.VALUE_ANTIALIAS_ON);
share|improve this question
    
Do they use the same font? – Shimon Rachlenko Sep 16 '13 at 12:23
1  
maybe they use another default font? – JohnnyAW Sep 16 '13 at 12:24
1  
Similar question asked here: superuser.com/questions/112326/… – Goibniu Sep 16 '13 at 13:04
up vote 13 down vote accepted

Java 6 was developed by Apple. Apple put a lot of work into the graphics layer to make it work with Quartz/Cocoa and especially to make it look good.

For Java 7, the development was taken over by Oracle. This doesn't mean that Oracle got the sources from Apple. Instead, they started over (probably porting some Unix code to OS X). This means all the work that Apple put into making Java look good on OS X was basically lost.

Apple cares a lot about design. Oracle ... well ... not so much (exhibit A, exhibit B)

What can you do?

  • Write and submit a patch to the OpenJDK.
  • Get enough people who care to ask Apple to submit a patch (money might help).
  • Go back to Java 6
  • Use JNI to access Cocoa/Quartz directly so you get the OS X font rendering engine.

Related articles:

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 For the two exhibits. – arshajii Sep 16 '13 at 14:34
    
Interesting. Doesn't really make sense not to give Oracle their implementation... – alistair Sep 16 '13 at 19:26
1  
@alistair: From a technical point of view, you're right. But greed is trying to take over IT (see patent trolls, the lawsuits between Apple and Samsung). I guess Apple would give Oracle a copy if Oracle licensed it but Oracle doesn't want to license anything unless it can make money with it. How much did you pay for your copy of Java 7? So it's a deadlock. – Aaron Digulla Sep 17 '13 at 7:06

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