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Ackermann's Function is a recursive mathematical algorithm that can be used to test how well a computer performs recursion. Design a function ackermann(m,n), which solves Ackermann's Function. Use the following logic in your function:

If m = 0, then return n + 1  
If n = 0 then return ackermann(m-1, 1)  
Otherwise, return ackermann(m-1, ackermann(m, n-1))  

The program stops after it hits 13. Can anyone tell me what I have done wrong?

declare main()
declare ackermann(m:int, n:int)

openconsole
main()
print:print "Press any key to quit...",
do:until inkey$<>""
closeconsole
end

sub main()
 def counter, m, n:int
 counter = 0
 for counter = 1 to 100
  print ackermann(counter)
 next counter
return

sub ackermann(m, n)
 if m = 0
  return = n + 1
 else
  if n = 0
   return = ackermann(m - 1, 1)
  else
    return = ackermann(m - 1, ackermann(m, n - 1))
  endif
endif
return
share|improve this question
    
Is this a stack size/memory limit? I know some languages will halt large recursive calls for fear of infinite recursion. – Corey D Dec 10 '09 at 18:48
    
good possibility. – Tara Dec 14 '09 at 2:32

Your print statement is

print ackermann(counter)

but your function is

sub ackermann(m, n)

You need to send a second parameter in the first call.

share|improve this answer
    
I saw that too; but I'm really curious as to how it got to 13 but couldn't continue if that's the cause of the error. – overslacked Dec 10 '09 at 18:47
    
yeh, I've been trying find IBasic syntax on the web so I could see what's up with that, but all I can find is cheap download sites, no real info anywhere. – Lance Roberts Dec 10 '09 at 18:50

Do note that Ackermann's function grows incredibly quickly - values above m,n > (3,4) are going to have a LOT of digits and if you go more than even about (4,4) you'll quickly find numbers that could quite possibly fill up your memory entirely with digits...

Refer to Wikipedia to see the magnitude of the numbers you are trying to compute...

share|improve this answer
declare main()
declare ackermann(m:int, n:int)


openconsole
main()
print:print "Press any key to quit...",
do:until inkey$<>""
closeconsole
end

sub main()
print  Ackermann(3,5)
return

sub ackermann(m, n)
    if m = 0
    	return = n + 1
    else
    	if n = 0
    		return = ackermann(m - 1, 1)
    	else
    		 return = ackermann(m - 1, ackermann(m, n - 1))
    	endif
    endif
return
share|improve this answer

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