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We all know, that in C# an ENUM Type cannot defined with numbers (integers)

e.g. public enum SOME_INTEGERS {3,6,8,11} is not possible

So my question is, how can I define such a resticted type of integers (set of some selected integers) in C#? In other words, I want to define a variable like this:

private SOME_INTEGERS myVariable;

myVariable may only have the values 3,6,8 or 11

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I'm not sure what do you want but Array or List<int> ? –  Soner Gönül Sep 16 '13 at 14:46
1  
I think he wants myVariable to be one int of either 3,6,8 or 11. If so a simple wrapper type with validating constructors should suffice. –  Ibasa Sep 16 '13 at 14:48
2  
enum SOME_INTEGERS { _3 = 3, _6 = 6, _8 = 8, _11 = 11 } looks ugly but is this you need? –  Sriram Sakthivel Sep 16 '13 at 14:51
1  
What's the bigger problem here? It sounds like it could be an XY problem. meta.stackexchange.com/questions/66377/what-is-the-xy-problem. –  Matthew Steeples Sep 16 '13 at 14:53
1  
You do know that even with that "restriction", something like myVariable = (SOME_INTEGERS)43241; would be perfectly legal? –  Corak Sep 16 '13 at 14:53

3 Answers 3

You can use something like this:

    public enum SOME_INTEGERS {
        One = 1,
        Three = 3,
        Five = 5
    }

    SOME_INTEGERS integer = SOME_INTEGERS.Three;
    Console.WriteLine((int)integer);//3
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2  
That doesn't actually restrict the values; SOME_INTEGERS can still be backed by any int. For example, using your enum, the line var x = (SOME_INTEGERS) 42; will work OK. –  w0lf Sep 16 '13 at 14:54

Here are some options:

// note that ((SomeIntegers)1) is a valid value with this scheme
public enum SomeIntegers { Three = 3, Six = 6, Eight = 8, Eleven = 11 }

// this stores the set of integers, but your logic to ensure the variable is
// one of these values must exist elsewhere, e.g. in property getters/setters
public ISet<int> SomeIntegers = new HashSet<int> {3,6,8,11};

// this class is a pseudo-enum, and with the exception of reflection,
// will ensure that only the specified values can be set
public sealed class SomeIntegers
{
    public static readonly SomeIntegers Three = new SomeIntegers(3);
    public static readonly SomeIntegers Six = new SomeIntegers(6);
    public static readonly SomeIntegers Eight = new SomeIntegers(8);
    public static readonly SomeIntegers Eleven = new SomeIntegers(11);
    public int Value { get; private set; }
    private SomeIntegers(int value)
    {
        this.Value = value;
    }
    public static implicit operator int(SomeIntegers someInteger)
    {
        return someInteger.Value;
    }
    public static explicit operator SomeIntegers(int value)
    {
        switch (value)
        {
            case 3:
                return Three;
            case 6:
                return Six;
            case 8:
                return Eight;
            case 11:
                return Eleven;
            default:
                throw new ArgumentException("Invalid value", "value");
        }
    }
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return this.Value.ToString();
    }
}
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Maybe a struct:

struct MyInt
{
    static readonly int[] legalValues = { 3, 6, 8, 11 };

    public int Value
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }

    public bool IsIllegal
    {
        get
        {
            return Value == 0;
        }
    }

    MyInt(int value)
        : this()
    {
        Value = value;
    }

    public static implicit operator MyInt(int value)
    {
        if (legalValues.Contains(value))
        {
            return new MyInt(value);
        }

        return new MyInt();
    }
}

But you can create illegal values.

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1  
Or you just throw an invalidcastexception in your operator and an Exception in the constructor if the value is invalid. The you don't need isIllegal –  Bob Vale Sep 16 '13 at 15:03
    
Not a bad solution but I note that new MyInt() will make a zero. –  Eric Lippert Sep 16 '13 at 15:04
    
@BobVale i consider this, but isn't bad practice throw inside a cast? –  Alessandro D'Andria Sep 16 '13 at 15:04
    
@EricLippert yes the default(MyInt) is illegal –  Alessandro D'Andria Sep 16 '13 at 15:05
1  
I'll suggest to make the cast explicit instead of implicit and throw InvalidCastException –  Sriram Sakthivel Sep 16 '13 at 15:19

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