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We have implemented a twisted web api.

To handle auth we have used a decorator that we wrap some routes with.

@requires_auth(roles=[Roles.Admin])
def get_secret_stuff(request):
    return 42

The requires_auth wrapper is implemented as follows.

def requires_auth(roles):
    def wrap(f):
        def wrapped_f(request, *args, **kwargs):
            # If the user is authenticated then...
            return f(request, *args, **kwargs)
        return wrapped_f
    return wrap

The issue is if there are multiple routes with this decorator, then a call to any of them results in the latest route to be decorated being called.

This is obviously not what I wanted and counter to my understanding of how decorators should work. I added some print statements to the code to try and figure it out:

def requires_auth(roles):
    def wrap(f):
        print(f) # This shows that the decorator is being called correctly once per each
                 # route that is decorated
        def wrapped_f(request, *args, **kwargs):
            # If the user is authenticated then...
            return f(request, *args, **kwargs)
        return wrapped_f
    return wrap

In case it is important, I am using twisted's inlineCallbacks for some of these routes, as well as twisted web's @app.route(url, methods) decorator for all of these routes.

Thank you for reading :)

EDIT: I removed the default argument to the constructor as I was told this was a bad idea :)

EDIT: Here is a minimal example that illustrates the problem:

from klein import Klein
import json
app = Klein()

def requires_auth(roles):
    def wrap(f):
        print('inside the first clojure with f=%s' % str(f))
        def wrapped_f(request, *args, **kwargs):
            print('inside the second closure with f=%s' % str(f))
            return f(request, *args, **kwargs)
        return wrapped_f
    return wrap

@app.route('/thing_a')
@requires_auth(roles=['user'])
def get_a(request):
    return json.dumps({'thing A': 'hello'})

@app.route('/thing_b')
@requires_auth(roles=['admin'])
def get_b(request):
    return json.dumps({'thing B': 'goodbye'})

app.run('0.0.0.0', 8080)

Going to the route '/thing_a' results in the json from route_b

share|improve this question
2  
Shouldn't wrap return wrapped_f? –  Max Sep 16 '13 at 16:21
    
Yeah sorry I mistakenly left that out, updated. –  avoid3d Sep 16 '13 at 16:26
1  
You have @requires_auth yet def require_auth... Note the s –  Eric Sep 16 '13 at 16:29
    
Once again, this was a typo :p –  avoid3d Sep 16 '13 at 16:46
    
Could you print f at the beginning and end of wrapped_f to ensure that it is still the same? –  poke Sep 16 '13 at 16:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this:

from functools import wraps

def require_auth(roles=(Roles.USER,), *args, **kwargs):

    def call(f, *args, **kwargs):
        return f(*args, **kwargs)

    def deco(f):
        @wraps(f)
        def wrapped_f(request, *a, **kw):
            # do your authentication here
            return call(f, request, *a, **kw)

        return wrapped_f

    return deco
share|improve this answer
    
It was @wraps that fixed it. This still works even without the call :) –  avoid3d Sep 16 '13 at 18:05

Avoid using mutable arguments (e.g. lists) as default parameters to any function or method. More on why this is a bad idea.

I can't confirm it, but there is a great possibility that this is what's causing your problem.

EDIT: In case I was unclear, I'm referring to

def requires_auth(roles=[Roles.USER]):

the default argument is mutable (a list).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the answer however after removing the default argument it appears the decorators still call the wrong function :( –  avoid3d Sep 16 '13 at 16:23
    
Yeah you were clear, see above. –  avoid3d Sep 16 '13 at 16:29
2  
Default mutable arguments are fine if you don't actually mutate them. Although def require_auth(roles=(Roles.USER,)): would be better here –  Eric Sep 16 '13 at 16:31

You need to apply your decorators in the right order. This will probably work:

@route(...)
@requires_auth(roles=[Roles.Admin])
def get_secret_stuff(request):
    return 42

And this probably won't:

@requires_auth(roles=[Roles.Admin])
@route(...)
def get_secret_stuff(request):
    return 42

Because respectively, these mean

Wrap get_secret_stuff in an authorizer, and use the result as a route

and

Use get_secret_stuff as a route, and wrap the result in an authorizer. The authorizer never makes it into the route.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you but I tried with only two routes defined and permutated every sensible order of wrappers and it still shows the same issue –  avoid3d Sep 16 '13 at 16:40
    
@avoid3d: You need to show us more code in your question - there's nothing wrong with the case you've reduced it to. –  Eric Sep 16 '13 at 17:04
    
Ok thank you, should I re-edit the question or make a new one. I plan on making a stand alone example –  avoid3d Sep 16 '13 at 17:13

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