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I came across the Java code below which looks good at first but never compiles :

public class UnwelcomeGuest {

    public static final long GUEST_USER_ID = -1;
    private static final long USER_ID;

    static {
        try {
            USER_ID = getUserIdFromEnvironment();
        } catch (IdUnavailableException e) {
            USER_ID = GUEST_USER_ID;
            System.out.println("Logging in as guest");
        }
    }

    private static long getUserIdFromEnvironment()
            throws IdUnavailableException {
        throw new IdUnavailableException(); // Simulate an error
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("User ID: " + USER_ID);
    }
}//Class ends here


//User defined Exception
class IdUnavailableException extends Exception {

     IdUnavailableException() { }

}//Class ends here

Below is the error message which comes in the IDE : variable USER_ID might already have been assigned.

Is there any problem with the value assignment to the static final variable ?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Final variables allow at most one assignment in the constructor or the initializer block. The reason this does not compile is that Java code analyzer sees two assignments to USER_ID in branches that do not look mutually exclusive to it.

Working around this problem is simple:

static {
    long theId;
    try {
        theId = getUserIdFromEnvironment();
    } catch (IdUnavailableException e) {
        theId = GUEST_USER_ID;
        System.out.println("Logging in as guest");
    }
    USER_ID = theId;
}
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But what is the problem with two assignments ? –  Kshitij Jain Sep 16 '13 at 17:02
2  
@KshitijJain Final variables allow only one assignment in the constructor or the initializer block. –  dasblinkenlight Sep 16 '13 at 17:03
3  
But I would expect that compiler knows that either the try or the catch block will be executed. So at runtime there should be just single assignment only. So why such behaviour? –  Rohit Jain Sep 16 '13 at 17:04
2  
@RohitJain I suspect that they took the easier way out: had the assignment not been the last instruction in the try block, the analyzer would have been right, because there would be another possibility to trigger an exception. –  dasblinkenlight Sep 16 '13 at 17:07
2  
@RohitJain We would not expect that compiler knows that either the try or the catch will be executed, we know that there is one case in which both will be executed, and the case is when there's actually the exception because the var is called for assignment (and now it cannot be called again for assignment), the exception is catch and then the var is called again for assignment creating the problem. The only way to do this is to call ONLY once the assignment as dasblinkenglight told –  Gianmarco Sep 16 '13 at 17:12

The fact that you have used the assignment operator to throw the Exception in the following line:

USER_ID = getUserIdFromEnvironment();

means that the compiler thinks that there is a possibility of assignment, especially given the fact that it is declared as final.

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Since the compiler gave you an that kind of error indicatesthat the variable has been creaated (and perhaps changed) somewhere else. It is good to change the name of your variable whereever it appears in your code.

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