Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've been stuck with an issue for a number of hours now. I'm trying to define a DSL using Racket's language extension features. I want to do something like the following pseudo-code. Ultimately I'd like to generate functions and macros given the input in the DSL, and most of that seems to work now, the problem is providing definitions which should work at the same level as the declarations. Is this even possible? It's late, and I'm sure I'm missing something really trivial. The most basic example of the problem is this:

tinylang.rkt:

#lang racket

; here we redefine module begin.
(provide (all-defined-out)
         (except-out (all-from-out racket) #%module-begin)
         (rename-out [module-begin #%module-begin])
         )

(define-syntax (module-begin stx)
  (syntax-case stx ()
    [(_ stmts ...)
     #`(#%module-begin
       (define (hello) (print "Yes!") (newline))
       ; (provide (for-syntax hello))
       (print "Function defined.")
       stmts ...   )]))

Now I try to use this new language elsewhere:

try.rkt:

#lang s-exp "tinylang.rkt"
(hello)

But I get the error "hello: unbound identifier in module in: hello", when loading the second module.

share|improve this question
    
You may also find this post useful. stackoverflow.com/questions/2890493/… – stchang Sep 16 '13 at 18:35
    
Thanks @stchang, I saw that post, it actually helped me along twhen starting this project. – Paul Sep 17 '13 at 8:43
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is that hello is defined in the lexical scope of tinylang.rkt but you want it to be in scope in try.rkt. You can use datum->syntax to set the lexical context of a piece of syntax.

This will fix the problem:

#lang racket

; here we redefine module begin.
(provide (all-defined-out)
         (except-out (all-from-out racket) #%module-begin)
         (rename-out [module-begin #%module-begin])
         )

(define-syntax (module-begin stx)
  (syntax-case stx ()
    [(_ stmts ...)
     #`(#%module-begin
       #,(datum->syntax 
          stx
          (syntax->datum 
           #'(define (hello) (print "Yes!") (newline))))
       (print "Function defined.")
       stmts ...   )]))

UPDATE:

In response to comments, the previous solution could be simplified to:

(define-syntax (module-begin stx)
  (syntax-case stx ()
    [(_ stmts ...)
     (with-syntax ([hello-fn (datum->syntax stx 'hello)])
       #`(#%module-begin
          (define (hello-fn) (print "Yes!") (newline))
          (print "Function defined.")
          stmts ...   ))]))
share|improve this answer
1  
Could the (syntax->datum #'____)) part simply be '____? Not a nitpicky/rhetorical question --- although I think the answer is yes, I'm genuinely asking. – Greg Hendershott Sep 16 '13 at 18:58
3  
Isn't the syntax->datum covering a little too much? Surely you want it to only cover hello, while keeping define, print, and newline hygienic. – Chris Jester-Young Sep 16 '13 at 21:15
1  
Yes, you are both correct of course. I'll update my response. Thanks. – stchang Sep 16 '13 at 21:18
    
Much better. But please fix your indentation. :-D – Chris Jester-Young Sep 16 '13 at 21:21
1  
I meant that your original hello has the context of the syntax where it's defined, which is different from its use. Your intuition is correct. It's not as simple as just cobbling together pieces of syntax and evaluating it. The reason has to do with favoring local reasoning. Imagine another definition of hello in your original try.rkt. Which should the call to (hello) refer to? The Racket architects (among others) decided that favoring the local definition makes programs easier to reason about. The behavior you want is the uncommon case and thus takes more work to pull off. – stchang Sep 17 '13 at 17:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.