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I am writing a program in C on Linux, and I want to let the user specify a text file to be opened from the terminal. So the user types:

./program < nums.txt

And the program will read whats in that .txt file. Currently, I specify the filename to be opened myself, using the code below:

fp = fopen("nums.txt","r");

Note that nums.txt just contains two numbers separated by a space which are used for a min and max value.

I am just learning C and am uncertain how to go about doing this. I've searched Stack Overflow and used search engines but still can't solve this issue.

Thanks.

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If the user types ./program < nums.txt, then the shell will pipe the contents of nums.txt automagically through the standard input stream. So you can just use fgets(), or getline() or fread() or scanf() or whatever you prefer. –  user529758 Sep 16 '13 at 20:13
    
Thanks, this worked perfectly, didn't realize I could do it so simply! –  Richard Sep 16 '13 at 20:33
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2 Answers

It may help to understand how shell input redirection works.

For the command line you gave, the shell is going to open the file and hook it up to the standard input of the process. C already has a stream for the standard input, so you can just consume it like this, no fopen needed:

fp = stdin;

On the other hand, if you want the user to run your program like this:

./program nums.txt

Then you're going to want to use the argc and argv parameters of your main function, something like:

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    if (argc < 2)
        return 1;

    FILE *fp = fopen(argv[1], "r");

...

The argc variable contains the number of parameters passed and argv is an array with each parameter as a string. The name used to invoke the program is usually the first element (argv[0]) which is why I used argv[1]. And, as always when working with arrays, make sure you don't try to access past the end.

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Here is how to read the first character of standard input (use as ./program <nums.txt):

#include <stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  FILE *f = stdin;
  int c = getc(f);
  /* int c = getchar();  -- Same as above. */
  if (c >= 0) printf("%c\n", c);
  return 0;
}

Here is how to read the first character of the file specified in the command-line (use as ./program nums.txt):

#include <stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  FILE *f = fopen(argv[1], "r");
  /* TODO: Handle f == NULL. */
  int c = getc(f);
  if (c >= 0) printf("%c\n", c);
  return 0;
}
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