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I am working on a problem: The user enters 3 tree heights and also the tree height limit. The program then calculates the amount of tree to remove.

Sample input:

 Tree1: 14
 Tree2: 7
 Tree3: 16

 Tree limit: 11

Sample output:

 Amount to remove: 8

This would usually not be too bad for me although I am still a beginner but the problem is, I am going to be calculating it WITHOUT an if statement. I must use Modulus to calculate. I have spent a very long time researching and trying different things but I just cannot seem to get it? Any ideas?

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closed as off-topic by Jens Gustedt, Mat, Joshua Taylor, bmargulies, chrylis Sep 17 '13 at 2:56

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

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7  
Can you post Code of your best try ? –  Gangadhar Sep 16 '13 at 20:14
    
Can you still use ternary statements? –  Smac89 Sep 16 '13 at 20:17
    
what do you mean by "without if statement"? No branching at all? Can you use loops? –  MK. Sep 16 '13 at 20:22
2  
@nos Amount to remove = (Tree1 - 11) + (Tree3 - 11). We omit Tree2 because it is <= 11. –  TooTone Sep 16 '13 at 20:32
1  
if is the correct tool. Other things are silly games that are not very helpful for actually learning anything. –  aschepler Sep 16 '13 at 21:03

8 Answers 8

The expression you're looking for is:

tree[i] % max % tree[i];

When tree[i] is greater than max:
example: 16 and 11

16 % 11 = 5
5 % 16 = 5

But when tree[i] is less than max:
example: 7 and 11

7 % 11 = 7
7 % 7 = 0

int main(void)
{
    int tree[3] = {0};
    int max = 0;
    int cut = 0;

    printf("Max Height: "),
    scanf("%d", &max);

    for(int i=0; i<3; ++i)
    {
        printf("Tree%d: ",i+1),
        scanf("%d", &tree[i]);
    }

    for(int i=0; i<3; ++i)
    {
        cut += (tree[i] % max) % tree[i];
    }
    printf("Amount to remove: %d\n", cut);

    getchar();
    return 0;
}
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3  
+1, probably handles the OP's case, but unfortunately this only holds until tree[i] >= n*max where n > 1. The answer will include integer division and modulo, but this puts the OP on the closest track. –  user7116 Sep 16 '13 at 20:44
4  
Will this work if tree[i] is, say, 25? You'd get an answer of 3 from the modulus calculations. –  verbose Sep 16 '13 at 20:48
    
+1 for the statement x%max%x. But an edit to fix the range problem would be good. Range in your solution is only good for 0<tree<2*tree. (as pointed out by several commenting on this post) –  ryyker Sep 16 '13 at 22:50
    
@ryyker: I know several people are pointing out limitations, but the fact is that I answered OP's question, and I don't want to do all his homework for him. I gave him plenty; he can fill in the rest. If you want to work out the details, be my guest. –  abelenky Sep 16 '13 at 23:43

Here's a general solution:

#include <stdio.h>

#define CUTAMOUNT(tr, lim) (tr - lim) * (((2 * tr) - ((2 * tr) % (tr + lim))) / (tr + lim - 1))

int main (int argc, char **argv) {

    int tree1 = 14;
    int tree2 = 7;
    int tree3 = 16;
    int limit = 11;

    int cutamounttotal = 0;

    cutamounttotal += CUTAMOUNT(tree1, limit);
    cutamounttotal += CUTAMOUNT(tree2, limit);
    cutamounttotal += CUTAMOUNT(tree3, limit);

    printf("Amount to remove: %d\n", cutamounttotal);

    return 0;
}
  • no branches
  • no loops
  • no conditionals
  • no ternary operations
  • no bitwise operations
  • no logic operations

Only arithmetic operations. The trick is to understand that % is the only arithmetic operator which can create a step. Operands must be sized appropriately to ensure the step only occurs where we want it and nowhere else. We can then exploit that step to give the desired result.

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2  
Flawless! Gladly eating my words as we speak. –  Paul Griffiths Sep 17 '13 at 1:07

You can do it using only absolute value function(abs), division, subtraction, addition.

Tree1: 14
Tree2: 7
Tree3: 16

Tree limit: 11

14-11=3 ----->3+abs(3)=6  ----------> 6/2 =3
7-11=-4 ----> -4 + abs(-4)=0 -------------> 0/2=0
16-11=5 -----> 5+abs(5)=10 ------------> 10/2 = 5
...
...
...
3+5 = 8 :D

The upper text shows how you convert smaller values to zero. So only bigger values are additively effective.

If you cannot use abs() then you can shift-left + shift-right combo to get absolute value. But this can go undefined behaviour. Results are implementation-defined for right-shifts of signed values.

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Probably the most general answer, but it just hides the implementation in the abs() function, which still must either use if, or some kind of trick with bit-shifting or conditionals. –  Paul Griffiths Sep 16 '13 at 21:30
    
Not always, it can use the msb bit to broadcast or multiply. For example, Val * msb.AND.1 is the thing. –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 16 '13 at 21:31
    
"Some kind of trick with bit-shifting or conditionals", in other words. –  Paul Griffiths Sep 16 '13 at 21:33
    
Yea, I just couldnt find the exact fiddling :) –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 16 '13 at 21:33
    
If we cannot hide "if", how others cannot hide cpu-level hardware "if" s ? Shifting left by 1 bit and shifting right by 1 bit just makes msb zero :P –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 16 '13 at 21:33

I'm a little disappointed in myself for giving this question so much thought, but that being said, I'm going to go out on a limb and say there is no general solution for all n > 0 that either doesn't use an if statement, or doesn't use some other kind of trickery to simulate one. I'll gladly eat my words if someone demonstrates me wrong.

For each tree, the obvious and correct solution is:

cut = max(height - limit, 0);

which is equivalent to:

if ( height - limit > 0 ) {
   cut = height - limit;
} else {
   cut = 0;
}

or alternatively:

if ( height > limit ) {
   cut = height - limit;
} else {
   cut = 0;
}

The simplest way (other than using a max() function) to simulate this without actually explicitly using an if statement is:

cut = (height - limit) * (height > limit);

since height > limit will evaluate to 1 or 0 at the right times.

You can also simulate it with a while loop as so:

cut = 0;
while ( height > limit ) {
   cut = height - limit;
   break;
}

and using a ternary operator is the most blatant way to claim to not use an if. There may be other tricks messing with bits, but the story is the same.

It's possible to modify any of these methods to employ the modulo operator as the question asks, but all that achieves is making a simpler algorithm more complex.

I suspect the method in abelenky's answer is the one that's being sought and probably the best overall solution to the question, here, even though it only works for 0 < n < 2 * limit.

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+1 Best solution. cut = (height - limit) * (height > limit) –  chux Sep 17 '13 at 2:23

Let's say you've already read in the 3 tree heights into an array:

int trees[3];
int limit = 11;
int i;
int cut = 0;
for (i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    int cut += trees[i] > limit
             ? (trees[i] / limit - 1) * limit + trees[i] % limit
             : 0;
}
printf("Amount to remove: %d\n", cut);
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1  
that's going to return number of trees that need to be cut, not total length to be cut. –  MK. Sep 16 '13 at 20:29

Assuming you are allowed to use *, /, and >, you can do it like so:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  int trees[3] = {24, 7, 16};
  int limit = 11;
  int allowedRemainder = 0;
  int mod = 0;
  int modCount = 0;
  int i;
  for (i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
  {
    allowedRemainder = (trees[i] / limit) - 1;
    mod = trees[i] % limit;

    modCount += (allowedRemainder > 0) * (allowedRemainder * limit) +
                (allowedRemainder >= 0) * mod;
    printf("Loop %d: mod = %d\n", i, modCount);
  }
  printf("Amount to remove: %d\n", modCount);
  return 0;
}

(allowedRemainder > 0) * (allowedRemainder * limit) says if we had at least limit more than allowed, add a multiple of limit to modCount. (allowedRemainder >= 0) * mod says if we had more than limit, add the remainder to modCount.

[Sample Code]

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This also only works when tree[n] < (limit * 2). If tree[0] was 30, for instance, then you end up with 8 * 1. –  Paul Griffiths Sep 16 '13 at 20:53
    
@PaulGriffiths: Good point, I fixed the logic to deal with that. –  Bill Sep 16 '13 at 21:04

[EDIT] - Solution for all values of tree, uses % operator, but not ternary:

#include <stdio.h>

#define MAX 11

int modsum(int a, int b, int c) ;

int main()
{
    int results;
    results = modsum(25, 7, 16);
    return 0;
}

int modsum(int a, int b, int c)
{
    int i, suma, sumb, sumc;

    i=0;
    while(a > 2*MAX)
    {
        i++;
        a -= MAX;
    }
    suma = (i*MAX)+(a%MAX%a);

    i=0;
    while(b > 2*MAX)
    {
        i++;
        b -= MAX;
    }
    sumb = (i*MAX)+(b%MAX%b);

    i=0;
    while(c > 2*MAX)
    {
        i++;
        c -= MAX;
    }
    sumc = (i*MAX)+(c%MAX%c);


    return suma+sumb+sumc;

}
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2  
How is "a>11 ? " different from "if staement"? –  MK. Sep 16 '13 at 20:37
    
@MK - It does depend on using the ternary operator, yes, but OP has not answered whether it is out of bounds to do so. –  ryyker Sep 16 '13 at 20:43
1  
ternary operator and if are the same thing. –  MK. Sep 16 '13 at 21:21
    
See edit, provide solution for all values of tree without ternary. –  ryyker Sep 16 '13 at 21:34
    
Using while is still cheating, if if isn't allowed. Instead of if ( h > max ) { cut = h - max; } else { cut = 0; } you could just do cut = 0; while ( h > max ) { cut = h - max; break; } Just goes to show what a silly problem this is. –  Paul Griffiths Sep 16 '13 at 21:58

Tree heights are in an array, because I'm too lazy to make 3 variables.
It makes use of modulo operator as requested.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
  int tree_h[]={14,7,16};
  int limit=11;
  int i;
  int remove=0;

  for(i=0;i<3;i++)
  {
    remove+=(tree_h[i]>limit)*(tree_h[i]%limit);
  }
  printf("Amount to remove: %d\n", remove);

  return 0;
}
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