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I am trying to write a test-bench that has the following components -

  1. A data source ( data_src )
  2. A data sink ( data_sink )

The data source and data sink are connected together by a data channel called a connector. The connector is basically a Thread Safe Queue. The data source thread pushes data into the connector and the data sink thread pops data off the connector. The requirement is that the data sink thread must not ever be able to write more than the queue depth number of samples to the connector. The queue dept of the connector is initialized at the construction of the connector ( see Testbed ). Obviously the data sink should never read an empty queue. When I run the code below, I see the orderliness of the data ( data coherency ) but the implementation I have appears to violate the data write restriction of writing more than queue dept number of samples... There are also very odd things that happen when the data write thread gets scheduled first. It will write a queue depth number of samples and then when the read thread appears it reads 0 samples BUT DOES NOT LOCK UP and continues to read the written data... eventually the read will stall and the data write thread will not get scheduled..... Can some one straighten me out ?? Thread programming is not as intutive as thought ;-( So this is what the program should do -

  1. Write thread - while queue size < depth; write data.
  2. Read thread - while queue size != 0; read data.

The code is compiled as follows - % more Makefile EXE="thread_safe_queue"

exe: g++ -g -o $(EXE) $(EXE).cpp -I /home/rmitra1/Eval/boost/include/ -L \
/home/rmitra1/Eval/boost/lib -lboost_thread -lpthread -lboost_system

-------------------------Program Code Follows ---------------------------------------------

#include <boost/thread.hpp>
#include <boost/thread/exceptions.hpp>
#include <boost/thread/mutex.hpp>
#include <boost/thread/condition_variable.hpp>
#include <iostream>
#include <queue>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace boost;
using namespace std;


///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
//A transaction is an electrical signal with a value(data)
//in discreet time(t_id)
///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

typedef struct transaction{
  float data;
  //the t_id is the transaction id; this is used to 
  //synchronize the data being generated by the producer 
  //threads
  int t_id; 
}sample__;


/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
//Thread safe queue; from which the connector is derived;
//it guarantees data coherency...
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

template<class T>
class thread_safe_queue{
public:
  typedef typename std::queue<T>::container_type container_type;
  typedef typename std::queue<T>::size_type size_type;
  typedef typename std::queue<T>::value_type value_type;

  thread_safe_queue(){ cout << "Depth :: " << depth << endl;}
  ~thread_safe_queue(){}

private:
  mutable boost::mutex mutex_;
  boost::condition_variable cond_;
  std::queue<T> queue_;

public:
  void push(const T& t){
    {


      boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mutex_);
      cout << "Write::Queue Size :: "<< thread_safe_queue<sample__>::size() << "Depth :: " << depth << endl;

      //wait for condition
      while(size() > depth){
        cout <<"Write Stall...."<<endl;
        cond_.wait(lock);
      }

      queue_.push(t);
      //cout << "Push @ " << t.t_id << " * " << t.data << endl; 
    }
    cond_.notify_one(); //notify other thread of addition to queue
  }

  void pop(T& t){


    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mutex_);
    cout << "Read::Queue Size :: "<< thread_safe_queue<sample__>::size() << "Depth :: " << depth << endl;

    //wait for condition
    while(queue_.empty()){
      cout << "Read Stall...."<<endl;
      cond_.wait(lock);
    }

    //cout << "    Pop @ " << t.t_id << " * " << t.data << endl;
    t = queue_.front();
    queue_.pop();
  }

  size_type size() const {
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mutex_);
    return queue_.size();
  }

protected:
  int depth;



}; //class thread_safe_queue

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
//The connector class models a physical unidirectional attachment
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////


class connector : public thread_safe_queue<sample__> {

public:
  connector(int depth) : sample_cnt(0){
    thread_safe_queue<sample__>::depth = depth;
    cout << "Depth :: " << depth << endl;
  }
  ~connector(){}



  //*****************************************************
  //write method
  //*****************************************************
  void write_data(sample__ data_sample)
  {
    //cout << "Write::Queue Size :: "<< thread_safe_queue<sample__>::size() << endl;
      thread_safe_queue<sample__>::push(data_sample);

  }
  //******************************************************
  //read method
  //******************************************************
  sample__ read_data(void)
  {
    sample__ sample;

    //cout << "Read::Queue Size :: "<< thread_safe_queue<sample__>::size() << endl;
    thread_safe_queue<sample__>::pop(sample);
    return(sample);


  }
private:
  int sample_cnt;
  boost::condition_variable cond_;
  mutable boost::mutex mutex_;


};


/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
//Data Source
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

class data_src{
public:
  connector *this_foo;
  data_src(connector *foo) : this_foo(foo){}
  ~data_src(){}
  void write(connector *foo)
  {
    sample__ in;
    int ii=0;
    while(1){
      in.data = rand();
      in.t_id = ii;
      this_foo->write_data(in);
      ii++;
      //sleep(2);
    }

  }
};//class data_src

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
//Data Sink
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

class data_sink{
public:
  connector *this_foo;
  data_sink(connector *foo) : this_foo(foo){}
  ~data_sink(){}
  void read(connector *foo)
  {
    sample__ out;
    while(1){
      out=this_foo->read_data();    
    }    
  }
};


class run : public boost::thread
{

};

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
//Testbed.....
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////


int main(int argc, char**argv)
{

  connector *foo = new connector(5);
  data_src  generator(foo);
  data_sink terminal(foo);

  boost::thread __write;
  boost::thread __read;
  __write = boost::thread(&data_src::write, &generator, foo);
  __read  = boost::thread(&data_sink::read, &terminal,  foo);
  __read.join();
  __write.join();

}
share|improve this question
    
Why has the connector class got it's own, private mutex? If a mutex is going to protect a queue, there should only be one of them. Change the queue mutex access to protected and inherit it in connector. I don't see how the connector pop signals a push that is blocked on queue full to resume pushing? Also, the underscores hurt my eyes:) –  Martin James Sep 17 '13 at 6:22
    
Hi James, My bad I did fix the base class to have just the single mutex to protect the queue. So the mutex is now completely hidden to the derived class ( connector ). The push and pop methods now look like this - –  user2226356 Sep 18 '13 at 15:09
    
Hi James, see the modified code above. When I run this code, I REALLY stall without making forward progress in the code. The read and write methods in the connector class now only call pop and push in teh the base class, the pop and push implement the lock mutex.... Thoughts ??? –  user2226356 Sep 18 '13 at 15:17
    
Possibly comments in stackoverflow.com/questions/9118820/… will be helpful. –  CiaPan Mar 29 at 21:01

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