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I'm a beginner of C. When I use this while loop to print the contains of a file. The last line will print twice on Linux. It should not get into while loop when reach the end of file. It has no problem on windows.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main()
{

    char string[400];
    FILE *file_para;

    // Open the file
    if ((file_para = fopen("Test.txt", "r")) == NULL)
    {
        printf("cannot open file\n");
        getchar();
        return 0;
    }

    while (!feof(file_para))
    {
        fgets(string, 400, file_para);
        printf("**** %s", string);
    }

    fclose(file_para);
    getchar();
    return 0;
}
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marked as duplicate by Barmar, greatwolf, nmaier, Niall C., Kon Sep 17 '13 at 1:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Use fgets(...) as your loop condition. It will return NULL when it fails to read more characters. –  Mohammad Ali Baydoun Sep 17 '13 at 0:37
2  
The problem with the feof check (or at least the thing to be aware of) is that it is documented: "This indicator is generally set by a previous operation on the stream that attempted to read at or past the end-of-file." So you may be right at the end of file and it will still not indicate EOF until you do another read. So the last fgets that you've done may be past end of file. As @MohammadAliBaydoun indicates, you should use your fgets call as your read and your EOF check for the loop. –  lurker Sep 17 '13 at 0:42
    
Thank you very much. It works. –  Dan Sep 17 '13 at 0:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is the wrong way to use feof(). Use feof() to detect what went wrong after one of the main I/O functions failed. It does not predict whether you're about to reach EOF; it tells you when some I/O function has already reported EOF. C is not Pascal; in Pascal, you can (must?) check for EOF before calling the I/O functions.

while (fgets(string, sizeof(string), file_para) != 0)
{
    ...do printing, etc...
}
// If you need to, use `feof()` and `ferror()` to sort out what went wrong.

If you really, really insist on using feof(), then you also need to check your I/O operation:

while (!feof(file_para))
{
    if (fgets(string, sizeof(string), file_para) == 0)
        break;
    ...do printing, etc...
}

Note that you might be failing because ferror(file_para) evaluates to true even when feof(file_para) does not...so maybe you need while (!feof(file_para) && !ferror(file_para)), but that really is just more evidence that the while loop should be conditioned on the I/O function, not feof().

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This is a common anti-pattern:

while (!feof(file_para))
{
    fgets(string, 400, file_para);

feof() does not detect if the next input call will fail due to end-of-file; it tells you if the file has already reached end-of-file. You should only call it after an input function has already failed, to see why it failed (which could be either an error or end-of-file).

The correct pattern is:

while (fgets(string, 400, file_para))
{
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