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I'm trying to create two views using Flask. The first view show_entries displays a list of entries in a table. It also includes a form to create new entries.

The form gets submitted to a second view new_entry which accepts the POST method and is responsible for adding the new entry to the table using SQLAlchemy. new_entry then redirects back to show_entries.

My problem is that form.errors are not routed to show_entries, so the user never sees them. I'm not sure of the best way to go about this, or if I'm even on the right track with the way I've divided up the views.

Here's what I currently have:

def show_entries():
    entryForm = EntryForm()
    entries = g.user.entries
    return render_template('show_entries.html', 
                           entries=entries,
                           entryForm=entryForm)

def new_entry():
    form = EntryForm()
    if form.validate_on_submit():
        newEntry = Entry(g.user, form.time.data)
        db_session.add(newEntry)
        db_session.commit()
        flash('New entry was succesfully posted')
    return redirect(url_for('show_entries'))
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The normal pattern is to have /show_entries as a listing page with new_entry as the form. When you do a GET request to new_entry you get the form, then POST to it to add the entry. That way if there's an error you can just show it next to the form - all the data is available. If you split the views as you have then you'll need some way of moving the error data (and form data) from the new_entry view to the show_entries view.

Something more like (untested):

def show_entries():
    entries = g.user.entries
    return render_template('show_entries.html', 
                           entries=entries)

def new_entry():
    form = EntryForm()
    if form.validate_on_submit():
        newEntry = Entry(g.user, form.time.data)
        db_session.add(newEntry)
        db_session.commit()
        flash('New entry was successfully posted')
        return redirect(url_for('show_entries'))
    return render_template('show_new_entry_form.html', 
                           entryForm=form)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Aidan. But if I wanted to include a form in the show_entries page, so the user could add a new entry quickly without loading another page, how is this typically handled? – Lorenz Forvang Sep 17 '13 at 17:55
    
You might be best to do it all in the show_entries view then and not have the new_entry one at all. Alternatively you could use javascript for it - the js could make the request to the other view if you wanted. The issue with that is that you would have to either write custom js to display the errors returned from the view or have the view return just a fragment of html to redisplay. It really depends on your use-case. Do you need to support js-less browsers? – Aidan Kane Sep 17 '13 at 18:30
    
I think javascript will ultimately be required for what I have in mind. But it's outside my scope right now (I'm just trying to get a handle on Python). So in the meantime, I've settled on a middle ground: if the user inputs data correctly in the show_entries form, the entry will be added by new_entry and the user will be routed back to show_entries. If there's a validation error, new_entry will render show_new_entry_form.html and the user will see the errors. – Lorenz Forvang Sep 17 '13 at 19:46
    
Sounds like a reasonable compromise to me. – Aidan Kane Sep 17 '13 at 20:48

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