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Hi I'm trying to pass an array to pointers to a function. I tried doing it two ways. The first way I did was pass *array into the function but then I get the error message below. So I realized the mistake and changed it to array. But that made me think, why does the error say expecting a double pointer? The error now confuses me little bit. Could someone explain. Thanks.

add(struct node *arrayy[],int value)
{
struct node *nodey = (struct node *)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
nodey->x=value;

if(arrayy[value]==NULL)
{
printf("I am not pointing to something...now I am hehehe\n");
 arrayy[value]=nodey;
}
else
{
printf("I already have a head..now my link is pointing at something\n");
arrayy[value]->link=nodey;
}   
}

struct node *array[10]={NULL};
add(*array,4);
add(array,4);

Error Message

note: expected ‘struct node **’ but argument is of type ‘struct node *’
share|improve this question
    
Which line does this? The second to last? It's probably because you are dereferencing the first element of the array of pointers. –  Andon M. Coleman Sep 17 '13 at 2:06
    
add(*array,4) invokes the error message –  user68212 Sep 17 '13 at 2:08

1 Answer 1

You have

struct node *array[10]={NULL};

which is of type struct node *[] (aka, struct node **).

This is the type that add expects.

If you dereference that (with *array), your types no longer match the prototype of add.

share|improve this answer
    
I just want to make sure why it's (aka, struct node **). Is it because in my case I have an array of pointers. And arrays work by pointing to the first index of the array. So if I have something pointing to the first index of my array then It's a double pointer because the first index is already a pointer. Is this right? –  user68212 Sep 17 '13 at 2:23
    
@user68212 - The way I think of it is that an array 'points' to its contents. So for a standard array, say int thingy[], I have an int * which I can dereference using the special array notation, thingy[2], to get an int. In your case you have an array of pointers, so your array variable is a struct node **, and when you dereference it (to, eg, get contents) you get a struct node * (the type of its contents) –  sapi Sep 17 '13 at 2:40

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