Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Assuming this:

struct A {
    int a;
    int b;
};

struct B {
    int a;
    int b;

    int func() {
        return this->a + this->b;
    }
};

Would an instance of B contain a pointer to func?

To illustrate this question in code:

A a; // first 4 bytes are for `int a`, second 4 bytes are for `int b`
B b: // ditto, but is there an extra word for a pointer to function `func`?
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

No. Both a and b are exactly the same size (b does not store a pointer to func).

Class functions in C++ are not linked (pointed) from the object itself, they are simply stored as any other function. When you call a class function, you are simply calling a normal function (you are not calling it from a pointer). This is why doing something like b.func = another_func; is illegal in C++.

To illustrate this in code:

/////////
// C++
/////////
struct B {
    int a;
    int b;

    int func() {
        return this->a + this->b;
    }
};

B b;
b.func();


//////////////////////////////
// Example compile output if it was compiled to C (not actual compile output!)
// i.e. this C code will do the equivalent of the C++ code above
//////////////////////////////
struct B {
    int a;
    int b;
};

int B_func(struct B* this) {
    return this->a + this->b;
}

B b;
B_func(&b);

// This should illustrate why it is impossible to do this in C++:
// b.func = another_func;
share|improve this answer
1  
You might want to add that virtual functions are a bit different. – dyp Sep 17 '13 at 2:27
    
Member functions are not exactly "any normal functions". They do have hidden this argument. In fact, your C example is precisely what C++ compiler will do... Maybe your wording confused me and you actually meant exactly that. – Petr Budnik Sep 17 '13 at 2:33
    
@PetrBudnik Yes, my wording isn't the best :P Basically, what I meant was, when you call a member function, you're just calling it normally, and not through a pointer stored inside the object. – MiJyn Sep 17 '13 at 23:16

C++ functions are really just functions which (potentially) take a hidden pointer to the object as the first parameter. Uniqueness is achieved through name mangling.

Unless the function is virtual; classes which have one or more virtual functions have a "virtual function table" (vtable) and instances of those classes have the overhead of a pointer to their instance-specific vtable. Whether the vtable is before or after the object depends on the compiler/implementation.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.