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This is my dilema.

I need a function which would find the most occurring string pattern in a random text.

So if the input is this:

my name is john jane doe jane doe doe my name is jane doe doe my jane doe name is jane doe I go by the name of john joe jane doe is my name

Output sorted by occurrence should look like this (case insensitive):

  Rank    Freq  Phrase
      1       6  jane doe
      2       3  my name
      3       3  name is
      4       2  doe doe
      5       2  doe doe my
      6       2  doe my
      7       2  is jane
      8       2  is jane doe
      9       2  jane doe doe
     10       2  jane doe doe my
     11       2  my name is
     12       2  name is jane
     13       2  name is jane doe
etc...

In my case I need only phrases with 2 and more words. Any idea how to approach this issue?

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closed as off-topic by David Wallace, Raedwald, JB., Shadwell, BartoszKP Sep 17 '13 at 10:32

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – David Wallace, Raedwald, Shadwell, BartoszKP
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Please show us what have you tried –  gerrytan Sep 17 '13 at 2:27
    
I've working code for counting single word occurrence, but it's unusable for matching of patterns/phrases (which could be of unlimited size). I am really just starting to think about this as we speak. I am thinking to split entire text to words, then start pairing first with next and expand selection as I go and keep counters... something of that sort. –  jjj Sep 17 '13 at 2:33
    
For illustration, following online phrase counter is doing exactly what I need: writewords.org.uk/phrase_count.asp –  jjj Sep 17 '13 at 2:38
    
Sounds like your thinking is on the right track, any specifics you have a question on? –  Tim Sep 17 '13 at 2:41
    
You said "I am really just starting to think about this" - maybe you could do some more thinking yourself, before asking the rest of the Stack Overflow community to do your thinking for you. –  David Wallace Sep 17 '13 at 2:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

ORIGINAL VERSION - Due to using the String concatenation operator +, this version is very wasteful of both CPU and memory because it creates new char[] objects and copies data from one to another with each use of +.

public class CountPhrases {
    public static void main(String[] arg){
        String input = "my name is john jane doe jane doe doe my name is jane doe doe my jane doe name is jane doe I go by the name of john joe jane doe is my name";

        String[] split = input.split(" ");
        Map<String, Integer> counts = new HashMap<String,Integer>();
        for(int i=0; i<split.length-1; i++){
            String phrase = split[i];
             for(int j=i+1; j<split.length; j++){
                phrase += " " + split[j];
                Integer count = counts.get(phrase);
                 if(count==null){
                     counts.put(phrase, 1);
                 } else {
                     counts.put(phrase, count+1);
                 }
             }
        }

        Map.Entry<String,Integer>[] entries = counts.entrySet().toArray(new Map.Entry[0]);
        Arrays.sort(entries, new Comparator<Map.Entry<String, Integer>>() {
            @Override
            public int compare(Map.Entry<String, Integer> o1, Map.Entry<String, Integer> o2) {
                return o2.getValue().compareTo(o1.getValue());
            }
        });
        int rank=1;
        System.out.println("Rank Freq Phrase");
        for(Map.Entry<String,Integer> entry:entries){
            int count = entry.getValue();
            if(count>1){
                System.out.printf("%4d %4d %s\n", rank++, count,entry.getKey());
            }
        }
    }
}

Output:

Rank Freq Phrase
   1    6 jane doe
   2    3 name is
   3    3 my name
   4    2 name is jane doe
   5    2 jane doe doe
   6    2 doe my
   7    2 my name is
   8    2 is jane doe
   9    2 jane doe doe my
  10    2 name is jane
  11    2 is jane
  12    2 doe doe
  13    2 doe doe my

Process finished with exit code 0

NEW VERSION - Using String.substring saves both CPU and memory, as all Strings obtained by substring share the same char[] under the hood. This should run much faster.

public class CountPhrases {
    public static void main(String[] arg){
        String input = "my name is john jane doe jane doe doe my name is jane doe doe my jane doe name is jane doe I go by the name of john joe jane doe is my name";

        String[] split = input.split(" ");
        Map<String, Integer> counts = new HashMap<String,Integer>(split.length*(split.length-1)/2,1.0f);
        int idx0 = 0;
        for(int i=0; i<split.length-1; i++){
            int splitIpos = input.indexOf(split[i],idx0);
            int newPhraseLen = splitIpos-idx0+split[i].length();
            String phrase = input.substring(idx0, idx0+newPhraseLen);
            for(int j=i+1; j<split.length; j++){
                newPhraseLen = phrase.length()+split[j].length()+1;
                phrase=input.substring(idx0, idx0+newPhraseLen);
                Integer count = counts.get(phrase);
                if(count==null){
                     counts.put(phrase, 1);
                } else {
                     counts.put(phrase, count+1);
                }
            }
            idx0 = splitIpos+split[i].length()+1;
        }

        Map.Entry<String, Integer>[] entries = counts.entrySet().toArray(new Map.Entry[0]);
        Arrays.sort(entries, new Comparator<Map.Entry<String, Integer>>() {
            @Override
            public int compare(Map.Entry<String, Integer> o1, Map.Entry<String, Integer> o2) {
                return o2.getValue().compareTo(o1.getValue());
            }
        });
        int rank=1;
        System.out.println("Rank Freq Phrase");
        for(Map.Entry<String,Integer> entry:entries){
            int count = entry.getValue();
            if(count>1){
                System.out.printf("%4d %4d %s\n", rank++, count,entry.getKey());
            }
        }
    }
}

OUTPUT

Rank Freq Phrase
   1    6 jane doe
   2    3 name is
   3    3 my name
   4    2 name is jane doe
   5    2 jane doe doe
   6    2 doe my
   7    2 my name is
   8    2 is jane doe
   9    2 jane doe doe my
  10    2 name is jane
  11    2 is jane
  12    2 doe doe
  13    2 doe doe my

Process finished with exit code 0
share|improve this answer
    
Wow wow wow. I woke up earlier to work on this and voila!, here is my code done and ready. Please tell me you live in Toronto and I'll take you out for a beer. –  jjj Sep 17 '13 at 10:35
    
Nope, I'm in Texas. Just make sure you understand everything that's happening in that code. :) –  UFL1138 Sep 17 '13 at 14:17
    
It works just fine when I am running this code on about 300 words on my computer. But I've got into some major issues running this code on Android. It fails by running out of memory. Considering that I have a top of the line device (HTC One), I worry to release this as part of the code, it would most probably cause issues. Too bad, it was doing exactly what I needed. –  jjj Sep 18 '13 at 4:46
1  
Updated to make it go faster without being constrained on max phrase length/number of words. (Voting up comments is another good way to show appreciation. :)) –  UFL1138 Sep 18 '13 at 17:08
1  
Also I just updated it to initialize the hashmap to have approximately the right number of buckets and a load factor so that it won't have to rehash. –  UFL1138 Sep 18 '13 at 17:20

Use the idea of the Markov Algorithm of counting the words neighbors to create relations between words. Initially goes with one word, next with two and so on.

share|improve this answer
    
Any code example suitable for my needs? –  jjj Sep 17 '13 at 3:19
    String txt = "my name is songxiao name is";
    List<Map<String, Integer>> words = new ArrayList<Map<String, Integer>>();
    Map map = new HashMap<String, Integer>();
    String[] tmp = txt.split(" ");
    for (int i = 0; i < tmp.length - 1; i++) {
        String key = tmp[i];
        for (int j = 1; j < tmp.length - i; j++) {
            key += " " + tmp[i + j];
            if (map.containsKey(key)) {
                map.put(key, Integer.parseInt(map.get(key).toString()) + 1);
            } else {
                map.put(key, 1);
            }
        }
    }
    Iterator<String> it = map.keySet().iterator();
    while (it.hasNext()) {
        String key = it.next().toString();
        System.out.println(key + "     " + map.get(key));
    }

you can paste the code to you main method ,and run it .

share|improve this answer
    
I think it's more complex than that... –  UFL1138 Sep 17 '13 at 4:12

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