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Could someone please help me undeprecate this bit of code? This is the example give from Facebook (on how to connect to a FB account - https://developers.facebook.com/docs/android/getting-started/facebook-sdk-for-android/ ), however the marked line:

          Request.executeMeRequestAsync(session, new Request.GraphUserCallback() {

is deprecated. I tried to replace it with:

    Request.newMeRequest( session, callback, executeAsync() );  

However, the code is nested so confusingly that it messes it all up. I would appreciate any help you could give as I've been at this all day.

// start Facebook Login
Session.openActiveSession(this, true, new Session.StatusCallback() {

  // callback when session changes state
  @Override
  public void call(Session session, SessionState state, Exception exception) {
    if (session.isOpened()) {

      // make request to the /me API
      Request.executeMeRequestAsync(session, new Request.GraphUserCallback() { // *DEPRECATED

        // callback after Graph API response with user object
        @Override
        public void onCompleted(GraphUser user, Response response) {
          if (user != null) {
            TextView welcome = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.welcome);
            welcome.setText("Hello " + user.getName() + "!");
          }
        }
      });
    }
  }
});

}

Regards

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1 Answer

up vote 42 down vote accepted

Replace your Request.executeMeRequestAsync with:

Request.newMeRequest(session, new Request.GraphUserCallback() {

  // callback after Graph API response with user object
  @Override
  public void onCompleted(GraphUser user, Response response) {
    if (user != null) {
      TextView welcome = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.welcome);
      welcome.setText("Hello " + user.getName() + "!");
    }
  }
}).executeAsync();

i.e. Nothing changes except you're calling a slightly different method, and putting executeAsync() at the end.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks it helped! –  Mayuri Ruparel Mar 7 at 11:11
    
Fantastically useful explanation, thanks! –  Joe Blow May 28 at 10:26
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