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What is the difference between instantiation an object in declaration section and in the constructor section?

for example,

Case one is follows :

public ClassName{

    private ArrayList objectName = new Arraylist();
    public ClassName(){

    }
}

Case Two is as follows :

 public ClassName{

   public ClassName(){
           ArrayList objectName = new ArrayList();
    }
}

Is there any difference between objectName in declaration section and objectName in constructor section ?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

The scope is the difference.

Case 1

private ArrayList objectName = new Arraylist();

Here objectName is an instance variable, which is visible within an instance of the ClassName object. That means you access it using the . operator:

ClassName className = new ClassName();
className .objectName; // this is valid(assume this statements in the same class)

Case 2

public ClassName(){
    ArrayList objectName = new ArrayList();
}

Here, objectName is local to constructor, and is not visible within instances of ClassName:

   ClassName className = new ClassName();
   className .objectName; // this is invalid (compiler error)
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The first object which you instantiate in Class scope is visible to all class methods and constructors.
But the second Object which you create in Constructor is visible to that constructor only unless you declare it in class and instantiate in Constructor.

Basically declaration of an object defines the scope of an object with it. Refer this for more detail.

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do you have any resource to proof it? yet, I must say your answer makes sense to me :) – Kick Buttowski Sep 17 '13 at 5:44
    
This is right, except your terminology is off. What you're calling a Class scope is actually the instance scope. See Understanding Instance and Class Members. He's comparing an instance-field and a local variable, which you've correctly explained are very different from a scoping perspective. – DaoWen Sep 17 '13 at 5:46
1  
The 'resource to prove it' is the Java Language Specification. – EJP Sep 17 '13 at 6:03

1) When you create an object in costructor this object will be created only when this particular constructor is really called while object created during field initialization is created always.

2) You can create an object whose constructor throws a checked exception only in constructor

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