Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this function:

void update(int something, int nothing) {
    something = something+4;
    nothing = 3;
}

And then the function call:

int something = 2;
int nothing = 2;

update(something, nothing);

Inside the function, something would be 6 and nothing would be 3, but because we do not return anything, the values does not change.

For just one value, I could use the return-value from the function, but now I think that I have to use pointers, right?

I want both the something and the nothing to be returned from the function so I could use the new values after the function call, how do I do that? :)

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Send values using & and receive them using *

Example:

void update(int* something, int* nothing) {
    *something = *something+4;
    *nothing = 3;
}

int something = 2;
int nothing = 2;

update(&something, &nothing);

Two years without using C, but I think this is correct.

share|improve this answer
    
It would be nice to explain why your answer works.. –  Marco Sep 17 '13 at 7:05
    
So I think that & means the adress of the variable, and * is a pointer to that adress, right? I will try this! –  theva Sep 17 '13 at 7:09
    
@theva & references and * dereferences the variable. –  Hyperboreus Sep 17 '13 at 7:18
    
@theva No, if p is a pointer, then * dereferences the pointer, so it yields the value pointed to by the pointer. It is only the & operator the yields the address of an object. –  user529758 Sep 17 '13 at 8:09
add comment

Use the blow Code:

1)

  void update(int * something, int * nothing) 
    {
        *something = *something + 4;
        *nothing = 3;
    }

    int something = 2;
    int nothing   = 2;

    update(&something, &nothing);

It means you are passing the address of the variable into function update, and changing the value inside the address.

OR

2) make both something, nothing global variable. That also should work. But it is not a good solution.

share|improve this answer
add comment

What you want to do is referencing and dereferencing the variables. By calling &variable you get the pointer to that variable, by calling *variable you get, what this variable points to. Here you can get more information about pointers.

void update(int* something, int* nothing) {
    *something = *something+4
    *nothing = 3
}

int something = 2;
int nothing = 2;

update(&something, &nothing);

this is what you want, but it isn't the best style, as people that don't know the code could not understand what you are doing. What I mean by that is, that you should not modify parameter variables as long as it is not really needed. Most functions can be written without such behaviour.

If you really need to "return" two variables, this is what I would do:

int update(int something, int* nothing) {
    something += 4;
    *nothing = 3;
    return something;
}

int something = 2;
int nothing = 2;

something = update(something, &nothing);
share|improve this answer
    
You should clarify what you mean by best style. Do you refer to variable names or something else? –  user694733 Sep 17 '13 at 7:03
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.