Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to make a program with a server and multiple clients can connect to that server through the predefined port nummber. By the way, this is TCP in C. I have the following server code below:

SERVER CODE:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>    
#include <stdlib.h>    
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h> 
#include <unistd.h>    
#include <pthread.h> 

void *connection_handler(void *);

int main(int argc , char *argv[])
{
    int listenfd , connfd , c , *new_sock;
    struct sockaddr_in servaddr , cliaddr;
    listenfd = socket(PF_INET , SOCK_STREAM , 0);
    if (listenfd == -1)
        puts("SOCKET CREATION ERROR!");
        puts("Socket created");

    bzero(&servaddr, sizeof(servaddr));
    servaddr.sin_family = AF_INET;
    servaddr.sin_addr.s_addr = htonl(INADDR_ANY);
    servaddr.sin_port = htons(54321);
    bind(listenfd, (struct sockaddr*) &servaddr, sizeof(servaddr) );
    listen(listenfd,2);;
    c = sizeof(struct sockaddr_in);

    while( (connfd = accept(listenfd, (struct sockaddr *)&cliaddr, (socklen_t*)&c)) ){
            puts("Connection accepted");
        pthread_t sniffer_thread;
            new_sock = malloc(1);
            *new_sock = connfd;

            if( pthread_create( &sniffer_thread , NULL ,  connection_handler , (void*) new_sock) < 0)
        {
                perror("Thread Error Connection");
            return 1;
            }
            puts("Handler assigned");
        }

    if (connfd < 0)
    {
            perror("accept failed");
            return 1;
    }
        return 0;
}


void *connection_handler(void *socket_desc)
{
    int sock = *(int*)socket_desc;
    int read_size;
    char client_message[51]="";

    while( (read_size = recv(sock , client_message , 50, 0)) > 0 )
    {
            printf("%s",client_message);
        }

        if(read_size == 0)
        {
            puts("Client disconnected");
            fflush(stdout);
        }
        free(socket_desc);
    return 0;
}

CLIENT CODE:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>



int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  int sockfd;
  struct sockaddr_in servaddr;
  socklen_t len = sizeof(servaddr);
  char mesg[1024];

  if(argc!=2){ 
      printf("Usage: %s <ip_addr>\n",argv[0]);
      exit(1);
  }

  sockfd = socket(PF_INET,SOCK_STREAM,0);
  bzero(&servaddr, sizeof(servaddr));
  servaddr.sin_family = AF_INET;
  servaddr.sin_port = htons(54321);
  inet_pton(AF_INET,argv[1],&servaddr.sin_addr);
  connect(sockfd,(struct sockaddr *)&servaddr,sizeof(servaddr));

  while(1){
    fgets(mesg,sizeof(mesg),stdin);
    sendto(sockfd,mesg,strlen(mesg),0,(const struct sockaddr *)&servaddr,len);
  }
  close(sockfd);
  return 0;
}

I get the following output:

Socket created
Connection accepted
Handler assigned
Hello There!
What could be the problem?
I don't know?
the problem?
Hey!
't know?
the problem?

I typed in the following strings in the client terminal:

Hello There!
What could be the problem?
I don't know?
Hey!

The problem is when I typed the third string, the output is the third string with some parts of the second string still appearing. What could be the problem? Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
new_sock = malloc(1); *new_sock = connfd; : you must be new to C. –  joop Sep 17 '13 at 10:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

C strings are null terminated. You're not sending the zero byte that would terminate your string in your recieving buffer, so your printf will print out all characters it find until it reaches some zero byte. strlen returns length of string in number of characters, but without counting the zero byte at the end.

Try to change line in your client:

sendto(sockfd,mesg,strlen(mesg),0,(const struct sockaddr *)&servaddr,len);

Into:

sendto(sockfd,mesg,1+strlen(mesg),0,(const struct sockaddr *)&servaddr,len);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! It worked! –  JKTA Sep 17 '13 at 9:00
    
no problem, can i get the green check mark from you? :) –  nio Sep 17 '13 at 9:01
    
It says that I can accept your answer in 3 minutes. Just wait for it, but great thanks! –  JKTA Sep 17 '13 at 9:02
  1. TCP is stream oriented.

  2. You can not expect that write() writes as much data as you told it to write, as well as you can not expect that read() reads as much data as you told it ro read.

This both put together means that to transfer N bytes via a socket the number of calls to read() does not necessarily needs to match the number of calls to write().

And following this conclusion the only thing the reader could know is how much it read from the moment on it was created.

The only two synchronisation points between reader and writer are the creation and the shutdown of the connection. The period one can call a session.

So if one wants to transfer multiple blocks of data having different sizes unknown to the reader during one session one is in the need to establish additional synchronisation points during the session, that make the read detect that a full block had been received.

Doing so is implementing some sort of protocol.

There are endless possiblities how the protcol could look like. The detailed design of the protocol depends on the use cases which shall be covered by the application.

Assuming only text data shall be transfered a simple protocol could be to terminate each data block by a \n.

The writer loops around write() until all data is sent and finally sends a \n.

The reader loops around read() until a \n had been received.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.