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For as long as I can remember I have avoided using switch statement fallthrough. Actually, I can't remember it ever entering my consciousness as a possible way to do things as it was drilled into my head early on that it was nothing more than a bug in the switch statement. However, today I ran across some code that uses it by design, which got me immediately wondering what everyone in the community thinks about switch statement fallthrough.

Is it something that a programming language should explicitly not allow (like C# does, though it supplies a workaround) or is it a feature of any language that is powerful enough to leave in the programmer's hands?

Edit: I wasn't specific enough to what I meant by fallthrough. I use this type a lot:

    switch(m_loadAnimSubCt){
        case 0: 
        case 1: 
            // Do something
            break;
        case 2:
        case 3:
        case 4:
            // Do something
            break;
   }

However, I'm concerned about something like this.

   switch(m_loadAnimSubCt){
        case 0: 
        case 1: 
            // Do something but fall through to the other cases 
            // after doing it.
        case 2:
        case 3:
        case 4:
            // Do something else.
            break;
   }

This way whenever the case is 0, 1 it will do everything in the switch statement. I've seen this by design and I just don't know if I agree that switch statements should be used this way. I think the first code example is a very useful and safe. The second seems kind of dangerous.

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closed as not constructive by Robert Harvey Jun 12 '12 at 20:55

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
dupe of stackoverflow.com/questions/174155/… – nawfal May 17 '13 at 21:26
10  
Disagree about not constructive. 27 upvotes on the question says there are others who feel this way too. – Wes Modes Apr 19 '15 at 6:53

12 Answers 12

up vote 42 down vote accepted

It may depend on what you consider fallthrough. I'm ok with this sort of thing:

switch (value)
{
  case 0:
    result = ZERO_DIGIT;
    break;

  case 1:
  case 3:
  case 5:
  case 7:
  case 9:
     result = ODD_DIGIT;
     break;

  case 2:
  case 4:
  case 6:
  case 8:
     result = EVEN_DIGIT;
     break;
}

But if you have a case label followed by code that falls through to another case label, I'd pretty much always consider that evil. Perhaps moving the common code to a function and calling from both places would be a better idea.

And please note that I use the Marshall Cline definition of "evil"

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I agree with you: I don't think of your example as fallthrough, and if there's a case where I want to execute multiple blocks of code via fallthrough, there's probably a better way to do it. – Dave DuPlantis Oct 9 '08 at 18:29
2  
+1 simply for that definition of "evil". I will borrow that, thanks ;-) – Joachim Sauer Feb 9 '09 at 23:12
    
I get your point and you are right, but your example is really bad. Nobody should test test digits like this. Scnr, your answer is right anyway. – Tim Büthe Oct 1 '10 at 11:33
    
Case in point, that's the very thing that C# disallows. Likely for a reason :-) – Joey Sep 10 '11 at 21:08

It's a two-edged sword. Sometimes very useful, often dangerous.

When is it good? When you want 10 cases all processed the same way...

switch (c) {
  case 1:
  case 2:
            ... do some of the work ...
            /* FALLTHROUGH */
  case 17:
            ... do something ...
            break;
  case 5:
  case 43:
            ... do something else ...
            break;
}

The one rule I like is that if you ever do anything fancy where you exclude the break, you need a clear comment /* FALLTHROUGH */ to indicate that was your intention.

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2  
+1! I agree that it is occasionally the right answer, and I DOUBLY agree that when it's by design, it should be commented. (In a code review, I'd MAKE the other developer comment a by-design non-empty fall-through. Not that it happens; we're a C# shop where that's not supported :) – John Rudy Oct 9 '08 at 20:35
3  
I myself use a /* FALL THROUGH */ comment in my code where appropriate. =] – strager Dec 28 '08 at 7:18
    
If you PC-Lint, you have to insert /*-fallthrough*/, otherwise it complains. – Steve Melnikoff Aug 6 '09 at 22:58
    
still, if you wanted to make it clear that the behaviour is intentional you might as well do if(condition > 1 && condition <10) {condition = 1}; switch(... saves you cases(for clear looks) plus everyone can see that you really wanted those cases to trigger the same action. – Mark Jul 25 '14 at 7:48
1  
This is still terrible coding. The first case should call a function, the second case should call the same function then call a second function. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Dec 17 '14 at 21:21

Fallthrough is really a handy thing, depending on what you're doing. Consider this neat and understandable way to arrange options:

switch ($someoption) {
  case 'a':
  case 'b':
  case 'c':
    // do something
    break;
  case 'd':
  case 'e':
    // do something else
    break;
}

Imagine doing this with if/else. It would be a mess.

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I find this type of fallthrough to be very helpful – Mitchel Sellers Oct 9 '08 at 18:24

Have you heard of Duff's device? This is a great example of using switch fallthrough.

It's a feature that can be used and it can be abused, like almost all language features.

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Learn something new every day - thanks! I do feel for the poor devs that go though such contortions though. – Justin R. Oct 9 '08 at 18:47
    
Wow, that is quite something to wrap your brain around. – Fostah Oct 9 '08 at 19:30
3  
Note Duff's quoted comment in that article: "This code forms some sort of argument in that debate, but I'm not sure whether it's for or against." – therefromhere Feb 10 '09 at 0:09
    
Duff's device is clearly evil – Marjeta Apr 23 '13 at 14:23

It can be very useful a few times, but in general, no-fallthrough is the desired behavior. Fallthrough should be allowed, but not implicit.

An example, to update old versions of some data:

switch (version) {
    case 1:
        // update some stuff
    case 2:
        // update more stuff
    case 3:
        // update even more stuff
    case 4:
        // and so on
}
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I'd love a different syntax for fallbacks in switches, something like, errr..

switch(myParam)
{
  case 0 or 1 or 2:
    // do something;
    break;
  case 3 or 4:
    // do something else;
    break;
}

Note: This would already be possible with enums, if you declare all cases on your enum using flags right? Doesn't sound so bad either, the cases could (should?) very well be part of your enum already.

Maybe this would be a nice case (no pun intended) for a fluent interface using extension methods? Something like, errr...

int value = 10;
value.Switch()
  .Case(() => { /* do something; */ }, new {0, 1, 2})
  .Case(() => { /* do something else */ } new {3, 4})
  .Default(() => { /* do the default case; */ });

Although that's probably even less readable :P

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1  
I like the first suggestion a lot. That reads very well and saves a few lines of code. The second took a minute to wrap my brain around but makes sense, but it does look primed to be a mess. – Fostah Feb 10 '09 at 16:24
1  
Yeah, that's what I thought as well, it was just a random mind fart I put down, in an effort to find a different way to switch using existing language constructs. – Erik van Brakel Feb 10 '09 at 23:35

Powerful and dangerous. The biggest problem with fall-through is that it's not explicit. For example, if you come across frequently-edited code that has a switch with fall-throughs, how do you know that's intentional and not a bug?

Anywhere I use it, I ensure that it's properly commented:

switch($var) {
    case 'first':
        // fall-through
    case 'second':
        i++;
        break;
 }
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1  
The intent is obvious if there is no code for case 'first'. If you code in there, and also want to run the code for case 'second', then the comment is important. But I'd avoid that scenario anyway. – Joel Coehoorn Oct 9 '08 at 18:20
    
@Joel - I agree completely. In my shop, we've had people put in fallthough comments in such cases, and I think it reduces readability. If there's code there, though, put in the fallthrough comment. – Fred Larson Oct 9 '08 at 18:30

As with anything: if used with care, it can be an elegant tool.

However, i think the drawbacks more than justify NOT to use it, and finally not to allow it anymore (C#). Among the problems are:

  • it's easy to "forget" a break
  • it's not always obvious for code maintainers THAT an omitted break was intentional

good use of a switch/case fallthrough:

switch (x)
{
case 1:
case 2:
case 3:
 do something
 break;
}

BAAAAAD use of a switch/case fallthrough:

switch (x)
{
case 1:
    some code
case 2:
    some more code
case 3:
    even more code
    break;
}

This can be rewritten using if/else constructs with no loss at all in my opinion.

My final word: stay away from fall-through case labels as in the BAD example, unless you are maintaining legacy code where this style is used and well understood.

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1  
You can re-write most language constructs using if() and goto... that doesn't justify abandoning an explicit construct though. – Shog9 Oct 9 '08 at 18:20
2  
I know but switch/case constructs that explicitly use the "case 1: some code case 2: some more code case 3: final code break;" can and should be rewritten using if/else if (my opinion). – steffenj Oct 9 '08 at 18:24

I don't like my switch statements to fall through - it's far too error prone and hard to read. The only exception is when multiple case statements all do exactly the same thing.

If there is some common code that multiple branches of a switch statement want to use, I extract that into a separate common function that can be called in any branch.

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Using fall-through like in your first example is clearly OK, I would not consider it a real fall-through.

The second example is dangerous and (if not commented extensively) non-obvious. I teach my students not to use such constructs UNLESS they consider it worth the to devote a comment block to it, which describes that this is an intentional fallthrough, and why this solution is better than the alternatives. This discourages sloppy use, but still makes it allowed in the cases where it is used to an advantage.

This is more or less equivalent to what we did in space projects when someone wanted to violate the coding standard: they had to apply for dispensation (and I was called on to advise about the ruling).

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fall thought should be used only when it is used as a jump table into a block of code. If there is any part of the code with an unconditional break before more cases, all the case groups should end that way. Anything else is "evil".

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In some instances, using fall-throughs is an act of laziness on the part of the programmer - they could use a series of || statements, for example, but instead use a series of 'catch-all' switch cases.

That being said, I've found them to be especially helpful when I know that eventually I'm going to need the options anyway (for example in a menu response), but have not yet implemented all the choices. Likewise, if you're doing a fall-through for both 'a' and 'A', I find it substantially cleaner to use the switch fall-through than a compound if statement.

It's probably a matter of style and how the programmers think, but I'm not generally fond of removing components of a language in the name of 'safety' - which is why I tend towards C and its variants/descendants more than, say, Java. I like being able to monkey-around with pointers and the like, even when I have no "reason" to.

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