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Assume algo(p) is an algorithm that take Theta(p) time to execute and does not change p. Determine the running time complexity of the following algorithm:

Algo2(n) 
begin
p=1;
while p <= n 
    begin 
    algo(p)
    p=2*p
    end;
end;

Really have no idea where to begin, I was thinking O(logn) maybe since p=p*2 but then there is an algo(p) in the while loop and I don't know how that would effect things.

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How did you get log(n) from p = p*2 –  TwilightSparkleTheGeek Oct 15 '14 at 21:09
    
@TwilightSparkleTheGeek Read the answer given by Henrik, he explains why the answer to this problem is Theta(n). –  user2321926 Oct 18 '14 at 13:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's Big Theta(n):

It calls algo(p) O(logn) times with p = 1, 2, 4, ..., 2^(floor(logn)). This is Theta(1 + 2 + ... + 2^(floor(logn)) = Theta(2^(floor(logn+1)-1) = Theta(n).

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what does floor mean exactly? –  user2321926 Sep 17 '13 at 10:28
    
got it. . . thanks! –  user2321926 Sep 17 '13 at 10:44

To get an easier problem, you can set it like this :

Algo(n)
  begin
  p=1, i=1
  while p<= n
    begin
    algo(p)
    p=2*p
    i++
    end
  end

which you can rewrite like that :

Algo(n)
  begin
  i=1
  while 2^(i-1)<=n
    begin
    algo(2^(i-1))
    i++
    end
  end

Then, as Henrik said :

It calls algo(p) O(logn) times with p = 1, 2, 4, ..., 2^(floor(logn)). This is Theta(1 + 2 + ... + 2^(floor(logn)) = Theta(2^(floor(logn+1)-1) = Theta(n).

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1  
That's not correct. The loop is executed O(logn) times, but the complexity of the whole algortithm including the calls to algo is Theta(n). –  Henrik Sep 17 '13 at 10:17
    
I misread his post. I'll correct my answer, thanks for pointing it out. –  Clément Berthou Sep 17 '13 at 10:23

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