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As far as i know according to mathematics rounding should work as below when rounding number is 5.

2.435 => 2.44 (Round Up, if rounding to digit(3) is odd number)
2.445 => 2.44 (Round Down, if rounding to digit(4) is even number)

if we do summation all fine,

2.435 + 2.445 =  4.88
2.44 + 2.44 = 4.88 

I'm pretty sure in .Net also rounding works like this.

But in SQL server, 5 is always rounding up which is not correct according to maths.

SELECT round(2.345, 2)  = 2.35
SELECT round(2.335, 2) => 2.34

this results to 1 cent discrepancies in summation of rounded values.

2.345 + 2.335 = 4.68
2.35 + 2.34 = 4.69 => which is not correct

I have tried this with decimal and money data types.

Am i doing something wrong? Is there a work around for this?

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1  
2.435 => 2.43 - why? It should be 2.44, always. –  juergen d Sep 17 '13 at 10:35
1  
0.5 should be rounded to 1 not to 0 –  makciook Sep 17 '13 at 10:36
    
Sorry i initially had it wrong. it shoud be other way round. Which is is, if odd rounding up, and if even rounding down.If you look at this .Net you will see this, double a = 2.235; double b = 2.245; double aRounded = Math.Round(a, 2); double bRounded = Math.Round(b, 2); –  user1686073 Sep 17 '13 at 10:46
    
It's not always rounding up, it's rounding away from zero, i.e. positive values are rounded up and negative values are rounded down. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rounding –  dnoeth Sep 17 '13 at 10:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're looking for Banker's Rounding - which is the default rounding in C# but is not how SQL Server ROUND() works.

See Why does TSQL on Sql Server 2000 round decimals inconsistently? as well as http://blogs.lessthandot.com/index.php/DataMgmt/DataDesign/sql-server-rounding-methods and http://www.chrispoulter.com/blog/post/rounding-decimals-using-net-and-t-sql

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Thanks this is what i was looking for. –  user1686073 Sep 17 '13 at 11:18

Mathematically rounding up at 5 is correct, and also the most commonly used type of rounding in basic mathematics. Other types of rounding are also valid, but are not basic mathematics, but more often used in certain areas due to 0.5 often being a dispute number.

What you call mathematically rounding is actually bankers rounding, which is the type of rounding used in the finance business.

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If you do want to use banker's rounding in SQL Server...

CREATE FUNCTION BankersRounding(@value decimal(36,11), @significantDigits INT)        
RETURNS MONEY        
AS        
BEGIN        
    -- if value = 12.345 and signficantDigits = 2...        

    -- base = 1000        
    declare @base int = power(10, @significantDigits + 1)        


    -- roundingValue = 12345        
    declare @roundingValue decimal(36,11) = floor(abs(@value) * @base)        
    -- roundingDigit = 5        
    declare @roundingDigit int = @roundingValue % 10        

    -- significantValue = 1234        
    declare @significantValue decimal(36,11) = floor(@roundingValue / 10)        
    -- lastSignificantDigit = 4        
    declare @lastSignificantDigit int = @significantValue % 10        


    -- awayFromZero = 12.35        
    declare @awayFromZero money = (@significantValue + 1) / (@base / 10)        
    -- towardsZero = 12.34        
    declare @towardsZero money = @significantValue / (@base / 10)        

    -- negative values handled slightly different        
    if @value < 0        
    begin        
        -- awayFromZero = -12.35        
        set @awayFromZero = ((-1 * @significantValue) - 1) / (@base / 10)        
        -- towardsZero = -12.34        
        set @towardsZero = (-1 * @significantValue) / (@base / 10)        
    end        

    -- default to towards zero (i.e. assume thousandths digit is 0-4)        
    declare @rv money = @towardsZero        
    if @roundingDigit > 5        
        set @rv = @awayFromZero  -- 5-9 goes away from 0        
    else if @roundingDigit = 5         
    begin        
        -- 5 goes to nearest even number (towards zero if even, away from zero if odd)        
        set @rv = case when @lastSignificantDigit % 2 = 0 then @towardsZero else @awayFromZero end        
    end        

    return @rv        

end        
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