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Say I have an array representing a network of nodes with connected nodes described as 'from nodes' and 'to nodes':

a = array([(1, 2), (2, 3), (3, 4), (4, 5), (2, 6), (6, 7), (7, 8), (2, 9),
       (9, 10), (10, 11), (2, 12), (12, 13), (13, 14), (13, 15), (14, 16)], 
      dtype=[('fnode', '<i4'), ('tnode', '<i4')])

a['fnode']
array([ 1,  2,  3,  4,  2,  6,  7,  2,  9, 10,  2, 12, 13, 13, 14])
a['tnode']
array([ 2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16])

How do I best combine the 'to nodes' into lists where they share the same 'from node'?

I am after this format:

#from-node  to-nodes
1             [2]
2             [3,6,9,12]
3             [4]
4             [5]
5             []
6             [7]
7             [8]
8             []
9             [10]
10            [11]
11            []
12            [13]
13            [14,15]
14            [16]
15            []
16            []

EDIT

To be clear, I would like 'from-nodes' with no 'to-nodes' (e.g. node 8) to be associated with an empty list.

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4 Answers 4

Use collections.defaultdict :

d = defaultdict(list)
map( lambda (k,v) : d[k].append(v), a)
print d
>> Out[40]: defaultdict(<type 'list'>, {1: [2], 2: [3, 6, 9, 12], 3: [4]
: [7], 7: [8], 9: [10], 10: [11], 12: [13], 13: [14, 15], 14: [16]})
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1  
Possible typo: d = defaultdict(list) –  atomh33ls Sep 17 '13 at 12:20
    
thanks, mate! .. –  georgesl Sep 17 '13 at 13:01
    
Is there a way to convert a defaultdict to a numpy array? –  atomh33ls Sep 17 '13 at 13:33
1  
you can't since the length of each elem is not constant (numpy.arry does not support variable-length nested list). If you still want to stick with numpy, you need to create an adjacency matrix –  georgesl Sep 17 '13 at 14:04

If you already use NumPy and not lists, I suppose your goal is to speed things up. In that case I would suggest using the Pandas library.

>>> pd.DataFrame(a).groupby('fnode').apply(lambda x: x['tnode'].values)
fnode
1                  [2]
2        [3, 6, 9, 12]
3                  [4]
4                  [5]
6                  [7]
7                  [8]
9                 [10]
10                [11]
12                [13]
13            [14, 15]
14                [16]
dtype: object

Timing information on a large array:

In [32]: a = array([(1, 2), (2, 3), (3, 4), (4, 5), (2, 6), (6, 7), (7, 8),
                    (2, 9), (9, 10), (10, 11), (2, 12), (12, 13), (13, 14),
                    (13, 15), (14, 16)] * 100000, 
                    dtype=[('fnode', '<i4'), ('tnode', '<i4')])
In [33]: %%timeit
         pd.DataFrame(a).groupby('fnode').apply(lambda x: x['tnode'].values)
10 loops, best of 3: 102 ms per loop

In [34]: %%timeit
         d = defaultdict(list)
         map( lambda (k,v) : d[k].append(v), a)
1 loops, best of 3: 5.76 s per loop
In [35]: %%timeit
         [(k, list(v)) for k,v in groupby(a, lambda (x, y): x)]
1 loops, best of 3: 9.02 s per loop
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You can use itertools.groupby.

Define the array:

A = np.array([(1, 2), (2, 3), (3, 4), (4, 5), (2, 6), (6, 7), (7, 8), (2, 9),
   (9, 10), (10, 11), (2, 12), (12, 13), (13, 14), (13, 15), (14, 16)], 
  dtype=[('fnode', '<i4'), ('tnode', '<i4')])

sort it:

A = sorted(A, key=lambda (a,b): a)

and then group it (I turn the generator into a list here so you can see its result):

In [18]: [(k, list(v)) for k,v in groupby(A, lambda (a,b): a)]
Out[18]: 
[(1, [(1, 2)]),
 (2, [(2, 3), (2, 6), (2, 9), (2, 12)]),
 (3, [(3, 4)]),
 (4, [(4, 5)]),
 (6, [(6, 7)]),
 (7, [(7, 8)]),
 (9, [(9, 10)]),
 (10, [(10, 11)]),
 (12, [(12, 13)]),
 (13, [(13, 14), (13, 15)]),
 (14, [(14, 16)])]

You can then do any post-processing you need.

For example, you're after something more like [(k, map(lambda (a,b): b, v)) for k,v ... in this example.

(Note that sorting the array is important. groupby operates in the same way as POSIX uniq, in that it will only combine adjacent elements. To combine all elements, sort by the same key as you group by.)

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This is a bit long-winded but it works (getting the empty lists as well):

np.array((np.unique(np.hstack((a['tnode'],a['fnode']))),np.array([a['tnode'][x].tolist() for x in [np.where(a['fnode']==y) for y in np.unique(np.hstack((a['tnode'],a['fnode'])))]]))).T

array([[1, [2]],
       [2, [3, 6, 9, 12]],
       [3, [4]],
       [4, [5]],
       [5, []],
       [6, [7]],
       [7, [8]],
       [8, []],
       [9, [10]],
       [10, [11]],
       [11, []],
       [12, [13]],
       [13, [14, 15]],
       [14, [16]],
       [15, []],
       [16, []]], dtype=object)

In a (possibly) more readable form:

uniq_nodes = np.unique(np.hstack((a['tnode'],a['fnode'])))   # list nodes in network
to_nodes_loc = [np.where(a['fnode']==y) for y in uniq_nodes] # find where nodes are in tonodes array
to_nodes = [a['tnode'][x].tolist() for x in to_nodes_loc]     # get to_nodes
np.array((uniq_nodes,np.array(to_nodes))).T                  # combine into array
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