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I'm not sure why, but when I'm load testing RavenDB for concurrent writes, under high load, I'm getting the following exception: "Collection was modified; enumeration operation may not execute."

By high load, I'm talking 1000 requests per second, updating 100 documents. To put some context on this, I'm going to be using RavenDB to log actions on an MVC site and I'm running a test harness to call the log method to see if it can handle logging this many things. Each document represents a user's actions in a session on the site.

If it helps, less documents with the same number of requests runs fine. Less documents with a proportionately higher number of requests per second also runs fine.

I've seen from researching this that sharing a IDocumentSession amongst threads is sometimes responsible, but I don't believe my code does this.

Here's the relevant logging logic:

public class ActivityLogger : IActivityLogger
{
    private static ActivityLogger _instance;
    public static ActivityLogger Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (_instance == null)
            {
                _instance = new ActivityLogger();
            }
            return _instance;
        }
        set { _instance = value; }
    }

    private static DocumentStore docStoreInstance;
    // keeping this as a singleton - we only ever want one as it's expensive
    private static DocumentStore DocumentStore
    {
        get
        {
            if (docStoreInstance == null)
            {
                docStoreInstance = new DocumentStore() {ConnectionStringName = "RavenLogging"};
                docStoreInstance.Initialize();
            }
            return docStoreInstance;
        }
    }

    ...

    /// <summary>
    /// Logs the given LogItem to Raven, to the given UserSession
    /// </summary>
    public void Log(LogItem item, UserSession userSession)
    {
        if (userSession == null)
        {
            return;
        }
        if (!userSession.Activities.Contains(item))
        {
            userSession.Activities.Add(item);
            if (Cache != null)
                Cache.AddToSession(CachedObjects.USER_LOGGING_SESSION, userSession);
        }
        // done in a task since we don't want the app to wait for us to finish logging
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            using (var session = DocumentStore.OpenSession())
            {
                try
                {
                    session.Store(userSession);
                    session.SaveChanges();
                }
                catch (Raven.Abstractions.Exceptions.ConcurrencyException ce)
                {
                    if (ce.ExpectedETag != ce.ActualETag)
                    {
                        // the user session is stale, reload it and try again
                        userSession = session.Load<UserSession>(userSession.Id);
                        Log(item, userSession);
                    }
                }
            }
        });
    }
}

Here is the code from my test harness

public void Begin()
{
    startTime = DateTime.Now;
    DateTime endTime = startTime.AddSeconds(Duration);
    int itemsLoggedThisSecond, secondsRemaining = 0;
    while (DateTime.Now < endTime)
    {
        // if we're still on the same second somehow, wait
        if (endTime.Subtract(DateTime.Now).Seconds == secondsRemaining)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(10);
            continue;
        }
        itemsLoggedThisSecond = 0;
        while (itemsLoggedThisSecond < RequestsPerSecond)
        {
            int innerItemsLoggedThisSecond = itemsLoggedThisSecond;
            Parallel.ForEach(Sessions, (session, state) =>
            {
                if (innerItemsLoggedThisSecond == RequestsPerSecond)
                {
                    state.Break();
                }
                var item = MakeRandomLogItem();
                ActivityLogger.Instance.Log(item, session);
                if (!session.Activities.Contains(item))
                {
                    session.Activities.Add(item);
                }
                innerItemsLoggedThisSecond++;
            });
            itemsLoggedThisSecond = innerItemsLoggedThisSecond;
        }
        secondsRemaining = (int) endTime.Subtract(DateTime.Now).TotalSeconds;
        Console.Write("\r" + secondsRemaining + " seconds remaining   ");
    }
}

And in case it helps, here is the exception.

  System.InvalidOperationException was unhandled by user code
  HResult=-2146233079
  Message=Collection was modified; enumeration operation may not execute.
  Source=mscorlib
  StackTrace:
       at System.ThrowHelper.ThrowInvalidOperationException(ExceptionResource resource)
       at System.Collections.Generic.List`1.Enumerator.MoveNextRare()
       at System.Collections.Generic.List`1.Enumerator.MoveNext()
       at Raven.Imports.Newtonsoft.Json.Serialization.JsonSerializerInternalWriter.SerializeList(JsonWriter writer, IWrappedCollection values, JsonArrayContract contract, JsonProperty member, JsonContainerContract collectionContract, JsonProperty containerProperty) in c:\Builds\RavenDB-Stable\Imports\Newtonsoft.Json\Src\Newtonsoft.Json\Serialization\JsonSerializerInternalWriter.cs:line 524
       at Raven.Imports.Newtonsoft.Json.Serialization.JsonSerializerInternalWriter.SerializeValue(JsonWriter writer, Object value, JsonContract valueContract, JsonProperty member, JsonContainerContract containerContract, JsonProperty containerProperty) in c:\Builds\RavenDB-Stable\Imports\Newtonsoft.Json\Src\Newtonsoft.Json\Serialization\JsonSerializerInternalWriter.cs:line 129
       at Raven.Imports.Newtonsoft.Json.Serialization.JsonSerializerInternalWriter.SerializeObject(JsonWriter writer, Object value, JsonObjectContract contract, JsonProperty member, JsonContainerContract collectionContract, JsonProperty containerProperty) in c:\Builds\RavenDB-Stable\Imports\Newtonsoft.Json\Src\Newtonsoft.Json\Serialization\JsonSerializerInternalWriter.cs:line 383
       at Raven.Imports.Newtonsoft.Json.Serialization.JsonSerializerInternalWriter.SerializeValue(JsonWriter writer, Object value, JsonContract valueContract, JsonProperty member, JsonContainerContract containerContract, JsonProperty containerProperty) in c:\Builds\RavenDB-Stable\Imports\Newtonsoft.Json\Src\Newtonsoft.Json\Serialization\JsonSerializerInternalWriter.cs:line 124
       at Raven.Imports.Newtonsoft.Json.Serialization.JsonSerializerInternalWriter.Serialize(JsonWriter jsonWriter, Object value) in c:\Builds\RavenDB-Stable\Imports\Newtonsoft.Json\Src\Newtonsoft.Json\Serialization\JsonSerializerInternalWriter.cs:line 62
       at Raven.Imports.Newtonsoft.Json.JsonSerializer.SerializeInternal(JsonWriter jsonWriter, Object value) in c:\Builds\RavenDB-Stable\Imports\Newtonsoft.Json\Src\Newtonsoft.Json\JsonSerializer.cs:line 627
       at Raven.Imports.Newtonsoft.Json.JsonSerializer.Serialize(JsonWriter jsonWriter, Object value) in c:\Builds\RavenDB-Stable\Imports\Newtonsoft.Json\Src\Newtonsoft.Json\JsonSerializer.cs:line 599
       at Raven.Json.Linq.RavenJToken.FromObjectInternal(Object o, JsonSerializer jsonSerializer) in c:\Builds\RavenDB-Stable\Raven.Abstractions\Json\Linq\RavenJToken.cs:line 83
       at Raven.Json.Linq.RavenJObject.FromObject(Object o, JsonSerializer jsonSerializer) in c:\Builds\RavenDB-Stable\Raven.Abstractions\Json\Linq\RavenJObject.cs:line 159
       at Raven.Client.Document.EntityToJson.GetObjectAsJson(Object entity) in c:\Builds\RavenDB-Stable\Raven.Client.Lightweight\Document\EntityToJson.cs:line 74
       at Raven.Client.Document.EntityToJson.ConvertEntityToJson(String key, Object entity, RavenJObject metadata) in c:\Builds\RavenDB-Stable\Raven.Client.Lightweight\Document\EntityToJson.cs:line 41
       at Raven.Client.Document.InMemoryDocumentSessionOperations.EntityChanged(Object entity, DocumentMetadata documentMetadata) in c:\Builds\RavenDB-Stable\Raven.Client.Lightweight\Document\InMemoryDocumentSessionOperations.cs:line 1033
       at Raven.Client.Document.InMemoryDocumentSessionOperations.<PrepareForEntitiesPuts>b__14(KeyValuePair`2 pair) in c:\Builds\RavenDB-Stable\Raven.Client.Lightweight\Document\InMemoryDocumentSessionOperations.cs:line 908
       at System.Linq.Enumerable.WhereEnumerableIterator`1.MoveNext()
       at System.Linq.Buffer`1..ctor(IEnumerable`1 source)
       at System.Linq.Enumerable.ToArray[TSource](IEnumerable`1 source)
       at Raven.Client.Document.InMemoryDocumentSessionOperations.PrepareForEntitiesPuts(SaveChangesData result) in c:\Builds\RavenDB-Stable\Raven.Client.Lightweight\Document\InMemoryDocumentSessionOperations.cs:line 908
       at Raven.Client.Document.InMemoryDocumentSessionOperations.PrepareForSaveChanges() in c:\Builds\RavenDB-Stable\Raven.Client.Lightweight\Document\InMemoryDocumentSessionOperations.cs:line 901
       at Raven.Client.Document.DocumentSession.SaveChanges() in c:\Builds\RavenDB-Stable\Raven.Client.Lightweight\Document\DocumentSession.cs:line 694
       at Pendragon.Infrastructure.ActivityLogger.<>c__DisplayClass2.<Log>b__1() in c:\Users\me\repos\project\project\Infrastructure\Logger.cs:line 103
       at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.InnerInvoke()
       at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.Execute()

I've not got any leads here, so any help gratefully appreciated.

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You are not synchronizing access to mutable shared variables (at least userSession is affected). Simple as that. A typical race condition. –  usr Sep 17 '13 at 12:15
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

At some level a collection is being enumerated by one thread, then another thread alters the collection. In short ActivityLogger.Instance isn't threadsafe.

I would have one raven connection per thread at least. You may consider not sharing a connection at all, and have one per request, particulary as you will get one MVCController per request when hosting so this will provide a more accurate stress test.

Simple solution may be to loose the singleton ActivityLogger.Instance and create a new one inside the Parallel.ForEach. i.e.

ActivityLogger.Instance.Log(item, session);

Becomes:

new ActivityLogger().Log(item, session);

(Assuming no other singletons are at play?)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for ditching the singleton pattern. Singletons have a way of quickly becoming thread-unsafe. I think separating the ActivityLogger into multiple instances with un-shared data will help keep threading issues at bay (in this particular context at least). –  David Peterson Sep 18 '13 at 15:41
    
This did seem to resolve the issue. I picked a singleton in preference to a static for this, but it seems there should be different instances. Something else that resolved this is moving the Raven DocumentStore to a public property of the global.asax MvcApplication class. Thanks for your help with this! –  Craig Brett Sep 20 '13 at 8:33
    
Cool, by the way, singleton & static, implies the same thing - 1 instance globally. Indeed, most singlton implementations are achieved by a static (static is what ActivityLogger.Instance must be). So picking one in preference to another makes no difference. –  weston Sep 20 '13 at 8:44
    
My main reason for picking the singleton pattern over static classes normally is for unit tests, so that the object can be mocked and the various benefits that that brings. But I do take your point :) –  Craig Brett Oct 6 '13 at 12:11
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