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In computing, reification has come to mean an explicit representation of a type—that is, run-time type information.

oracle tutorials says ,

A reifiable type is a type whose type information is fully available at runtime. This includes primitives, non-generic types, raw types, and invocations of unbound wildcards.

Non-reifiable types are types where information has been removed at compile-time by type erasure — invocations of generic types that are not defined as unbounded wildcards.

A type is reifiable if it is one of the following:

  1. A primitive type (such as int) //understood
  2. A nonparameterized class or interface type (such as Number, String, or Runnable) // why
  3. A parameterized type in which all type arguments are unbounded wildcards (such as List<?>, ArrayList<?>, or Map<?, ?>) // why
  4. A raw type (such as List, ArrayList, or Map) // why
  5. An array whose component type is reifiable(such as int[], Number[], List<?>[], List[], or int[][]) // why

A type is not reifiable if it is one of the following:

  1. A type variable(such as T) // why
  2. A parameterized type with actual parameters (such as List<Number>, ArrayList<String>, or Map<String, Integer>) // why
  3. A parameterized type with a bound (such as List<? extends Number> or Comparable<? super String>) // why

Why 2,3,4,5 is reifiable and 6,7,8 as non-reifiable?

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A reifiable type is a type whose type information is fully available at runtime. **This includes primitives, non-generic types, raw types, and invocations of unbound wildcards.** – sᴜʀᴇsʜ ᴀᴛᴛᴀ Sep 17 '13 at 11:41
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@Prateek I would first start with the question "How do I use Google to find information?" – occulus Sep 17 '13 at 11:42
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This question appears to be off-topic because it is about the definition of a language feature which is easily findable using Google. – occulus Sep 17 '13 at 11:46
    
@occulus i have changed my question.Please have a look at it. – Prateek Sep 17 '13 at 11:48
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This question is way beyond the scope of a Stackoverflow question. It concerns language design etc. Please read the Stackoverflow FAQ. – occulus Sep 17 '13 at 11:50

you could ask google the same question:

reifiable type

When you use generics, much of the time, compile-time type information is lost. At run time, often all the program knows about a reference is that is a reference to some sort of Object. If all the type information is also known at run time, the type is called reifiable. Perhaps some day generics will be redesigned so that all types are reifiable.

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i have changed my question, and its solution is not available on google – Prateek Sep 17 '13 at 11:58
    
Read the FAQ please. – occulus Sep 17 '13 at 12:08

A reifiable type is a type whose type information is fully available at runtime. This includes primitives, non-generic types, raw types, and invocations of unbound wildcards.

Non-reifiable types are types where information has been removed at compile-time by type erasure — invocations of generic types that are not defined as unbounded wildcards. A non-reifiable type does not have all of its information available at runtime. Examples of non-reifiable types are List<String> and List<Number>; the JVM cannot tell the difference between these types at runtime. As shown in Restrictions on Generics, there are certain situations where non-reifiable types cannot be used: in an instanceof expression, for example, or as an element in an array.

Reference

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Understand the meaning of this two terms.

Reifiable means whose type is fully available at run time means java compiler do not need any process of type erasure.

Non-Reifiable means java compiler needs type erasure process because type is not fully available.

A type is reifiable if it is one of the following:

1. A primitive type (such as int) :

Here think that when you write or use any int as a reference, do you think that compiler needs any process for identification for the type of int? no because int is int.... same for all primitive type

2. A nonparameterized class or interface type (such as Number, String, or Runnable)

same answer as i told in previous answer that compiler do not need any type erasure for Number, String, or Runnable.

3. A parameterized type in which all type arguments are unbounded wildcards (such as List<?>, ArrayList<?>, or Map<?, ?>)

All unbounded wildcard are accepted as reifiable type because it is already mention in definition of reifiable type, now it is up to the API developer why they consider it as a reifiable type.

4. A raw type (such as List, ArrayList, or Map) ::

same answer as first question

5. An array whose component type is reifiable(such as int[], Number[], List<?>[], List[], or int[][]) ::

same answer as first question

A type is not reifiable if it is one of the following:

6. A type variable(such as T) :

Because java can not identify the type of T, Compiler needs type erasure to identify the type.

7. A parameterized type with actual parameters (such as List<Number>, ArrayList<String>, or Map<String, Integer>):

Here all type is a generic type, at runtime compiler see List as List ... so as per definition of Non-refiable all these collection are consider as a non reifiable.

8. A parameterized type with a bound (such as List<? extends Number> or Comparable<? super String>).

same answer as previous one

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-1 Why do you mean under compiler needs type erasure to identify the type? It is very confusing and most probably simply wrong. As far as I know the major reason for type erasure in Java was the need of backwards compatibility with the code that had been written before Generics feature was added. – Alex Yursha Mar 4 at 5:09

Just an educated guess, but I suspect the key to understanding this is to recognize that while Java is a strongly typed language and verifies type references as part of the compilation process, in many cases the type information is not actually needed to execute the logic. In that case, the generated bytecode may know that it is working with an instance of an Object, but not know the type. That would especially make sense given that languages that do not use strong typing can be generated as java bytecode. So if the object type has been dropped, the instance would be non-reifiable.

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I'm not entirely sure I understand your question, but you might be referring to object types as opposed to primitive types. That question is all the more important as primitive types such as int or double cannot be used as generic types -- hence their wrapping classes such as Integer.

// This won't work
ArrayList<int> list = new ArrayList<int>();
// But this will
ArrayList<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();

To sum it up I'd say all objects -- and only objects -- are reifiable. (And therefore usable as generic types instantiation)

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a primitive type is also reifiable.please refer oracle tutorials for clearity – Prateek Sep 17 '13 at 12:05

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