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I am trying to write a little game in which there are bricks on a track.

My problem is that I would like to have a vector of bricks in the track class, but I would need to keep a pointer to the track in the brick class.

What I was trying to do is to have two header files track.h and brick.h and I wanted to include track.h in the brick.h file and vice-versa.

brick.h:

#pragma once

#include "track.h"

class brick
{
    public:
        brick (track &theTrack);
    private:
        track *mTrack;
};

brick::brick(track &theTrack)
{
    mTrack = &theTrack;
}

track.h:

#pragma once

#include "brick.h"

class track
{
    public:

    private:
        vector<brick> brickPositions;
};

However this results in compile errors.

I don’t use .cpp files for these classes, just a single .h file with #pragma once at the top.

Can you please explain what is the problem and how can I solve this?

share|improve this question
1  
See stackoverflow.com/questions/553682/…, etc. –  dbrank0 Sep 17 '13 at 11:59
3  
A forward declaration should be sufficient for pointer member. –  user2672165 Sep 17 '13 at 11:59
1  
... provided you write implementations in a cpp file –  doctorlove Sep 17 '13 at 12:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since the brick class only has a pointer to the track class, you can use a forward declaration.

#pragma once

class track;

class brick
{
    public:
        brick (track &theTrack);
    private:
        track *mTrack;
};

brick::brick(track &theTrack)
{
    mTrack = &theTrack;
}

You don't need to change the track class.

share|improve this answer
    
This is better answer. I didn't notice that track has variable to brick (just copied and pasted). –  khajvah Sep 17 '13 at 12:12
    
Three things: Using an initializer list for the pointer would be a better idea; #pragma once is not 100% portable (yet), use an include guard (in addition to or instead of, it's your choice); and if you are going to use a forward declaration, you do not need the header include in the header file, push it to the definition file. –  Casey Sep 17 '13 at 12:29
    
Thanks for your answer, @Ferruccio, but I still cannot solve it after many hours. My problem is that I cannot access anything in track from brick. Here is the skeleton code: pastebin.com/cgfz1zA1 –  caius Sep 17 '13 at 23:38
    
@caius Drop the "include "track.h"", define the track class with implementation of brick class(before brick::brick(track &theTrack)). –  khajvah Sep 18 '13 at 6:46
    
@khajvah - good catch. –  Ferruccio Sep 18 '13 at 10:33

You can do forward declaration:

 #pragma once

class brick;
class track
{
    public:

    private:
        vector<brick> brickPositions; //This might not compile, should be a pointer
};

However you need to have cpp file.

track.cpp:

    class brick
    {
        public:
            brick (track &theTrack);
        private:
            track *mTrack;
    };

    brick::brick(track &theTrack)
    {
        mTrack = &theTrack;
    }

Do the other way around (forward declare track before class brick), since you use only pointer to track in class brick.

P.S. Accept the answer below this :)

share|improve this answer
    
Can brick really be forward declared for use in vector<brick>? Upvoted at least. –  user2672165 Sep 17 '13 at 12:18
    
My first reaction was that you can't forward declare brick because track instantiates it. But it doesn't actually instantiate a brick. It instantiates a vector of brick and a vector is actually a fixed-sized object which contains a pointer to dynamically allocated memory. I tried it with VC++11 and it compiled without errors. Of course, that doesn't really mean much... –  Ferruccio Sep 17 '13 at 12:29
    
The standard requires container element types to be complete. –  Sebastian Redl Sep 17 '13 at 12:49

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