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I have a string "1112224444' it is a telephone number. I want to format as 111-222-4444 before I store it in a file. It is on a datarecord and I would prefer to be able to do this without assigning a new variable.

I was thinking:

String.Format("{0:###-###-####}", i["MyPhone"].ToString() );

but that does not seem to do the trick.

** UPDATE **

Ok. I went with this solution

Convert.ToInt64(i["Customer Phone"]).ToString("###-###-#### ####")

Now its gets messed up when the extension is less than 4 digits. It will fill in the numbers from the right. so

1112224444 333  becomes

11-221-244 3334

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
3  
Please be aware that not everywhere has 10-digit phone numbers, or uses the 111-222-4444 format. – Dour High Arch Sep 24 '10 at 22:22
    
This will fail with phone numbers starting with 0 – Evildonald Nov 17 '11 at 22:04
    
You should specify whether this is north american numbers only or not. – Armstrongest Nov 9 '12 at 17:44

15 Answers 15

From a good page full of examples:

String.Format("{0:(###) ###-####}", 8005551212);

    This will output "(800) 555-1212".

Although a regex may work even better, keep in mind the old programming quote:

Some people, when confronted with a problem, think “I know, I’ll use regular expressions.” Now they have two problems.
--Jamie Zawinski, in comp.lang.emacs

share|improve this answer
26  
I love that quote. – AMissico Jun 22 '10 at 0:35
9  
This is a bad implementation because if the area code starts with 0105555555 or something like that then you end up getting back (01) 555-5555 instead of (010) 555-5555. The reason being is that if you convert the phone number to a number then the zero at the front is seen as not being anything and and when you format it the first 0 gets dropped. – Paul Mendoza Mar 3 '11 at 18:13
2  
@Paul Please read the problem definition: "I have a string "1112224444' it is a telephone number. I want to format as 111-222-4444 before I store it in a file". – Sean Mar 29 '11 at 16:45
20  
This will not work if your phone number is a string, as the questions states, unless you convert it to a numerical value first. – JustinStolle Dec 1 '11 at 22:41
3  
I know this is just repeating the comment above, but this answer didn't answer the question. How do you format a string into a specific format, in this case a telephone number format. – dyslexicanaboko Oct 3 '12 at 15:19

I prefer to use regular expressions:

Regex.Replace("1112224444", @"(\d{3})(\d{3})(\d{4})", "$1-$2-$3");
share|improve this answer
3  
I suppose this would work, but the .ToString() format is easier to read and should perform better. – Joel Coehoorn Oct 9 '08 at 18:36
8  
If I'm dealing with a string already, as the poster has said, casting it to a long and back again seems silly. – Ryan Duffield Oct 9 '08 at 18:39
    
Maybe this is what I need after all. may handle the extension better – Brian G Dec 30 '08 at 14:44
35  
+1 for not treating a telephone number as a numeric value. – statenjason Sep 15 '09 at 17:47
4  
+1 for keeping the number as a string (given that often phone numbers used for automated SMS systems have to be stored in the +44 format) – Ed Woodcock Dec 18 '09 at 9:39

You'll need to break it into substrings. While you could do that without any extra variables, it wouldn't be particularly nice. Here's one potential solution:

string phone = i["MyPhone"].ToString();
string area = phone.Substring(0, 3);
string major = phone.Substring(3, 3);
string minor = phone.Substring(6);
string formatted = string.Format("{0}-{1}-{2}", area, major, minor);
share|improve this answer
    
Jon are you sure making three substrings is better than using string.format? – Pradeep Nov 19 '08 at 18:38
    
I use String.Format as well - but how are you suggesting to achieve the result without using String.Format? – Jon Skeet Nov 19 '08 at 22:35
    
StringBuilder? :P – poke Mar 11 '11 at 17:02
1  
I wrapped that in an if (phone.Length == 10) condition. – Zack Peterson Mar 31 '11 at 16:32
    
Plus One - One small point: that format doesn't look like it has parenthesis around the area code, maybe I'm reading it wrong. – Mark Rogers Nov 24 '14 at 16:30

As far as I know you can't do this with string.Format ... you would have to handle this yourself. You could just strip out all non-numeric characters and then do something like:

string.Format("({0}) {1}-{2}",
     phoneNumber.Substring(0, 3),
     phoneNumber.Substring(3, 3),
     phoneNumber.Substring(6));

This assumes the data has been entered correctly, which you could use regular expressions to validate.

share|improve this answer
3  
And it assumes a north american phone number – chris Sep 15 '09 at 23:11

I suggest this as a clean solution for US numbers.

public static string PhoneNumber(string value)
{ 
    value = new System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex(@"\D")
        .Replace(value, string.Empty);
    value = value.TrimStart('1');
    if (value.Length == 7)
        return Convert.ToInt64(value).ToString("###-####");
    if (value.Length == 10)
        return Convert.ToInt64(value).ToString("###-###-####");
    if (value.Length > 10)
        return Convert.ToInt64(value)
            .ToString("###-###-#### " + new String('#', (value.Length - 10)));
    return value;
}
share|improve this answer

If you can get i["MyPhone"] as a long, you can use the long.ToString() method to format it:

Convert.ToLong(i["MyPhone"]).ToString("###-###-####");

See the MSDN page on Numeric Format Strings.

Be careful to use long rather than int: int could overflow.

share|improve this answer
    
The issue with this is if the number is >10 characters long (i.e. includes an extension). This results in a very odd representation where 212-555-1212 x1234 comes out as 2125551-212-1234. – Michael Blackburn Jan 8 at 15:15

This should work:

String.Format("{0:(###)###-####}", Convert.ToInt64("1112224444"));

OR in your case:

String.Format("{0:###-###-####}", Convert.ToInt64("1112224444"));
share|improve this answer
2  
1 small problem if i am using 01213456789 its makes (12) 345-6789...any solution...? – Sangram Jun 8 '11 at 12:06
2  
This is the best solution. The leading zero is moot with regard to American phone numbers as there are no American area codes that begin with zero or one. – J.B. Jun 10 '12 at 0:54
static string FormatPhoneNumber( string phoneNumber ) {

   if ( String.IsNullOrEmpty(phoneNumber) )
      return phoneNumber;

   Regex phoneParser = null;
   string format     = "";

   switch( phoneNumber.Length ) {

      case 5 :
         phoneParser = new Regex(@"(\d{3})(\d{2})");
         format      = "$1 $2";
       break;

      case 6 :
         phoneParser = new Regex(@"(\d{2})(\d{2})(\d{2})");
         format      = "$1 $2 $3";
       break;

      case 7 :
         phoneParser = new Regex(@"(\d{3})(\d{2})(\d{2})");
         format      = "$1 $2 $3";
       break;

      case 8 :
         phoneParser = new Regex(@"(\d{4})(\d{2})(\d{2})");
         format      = "$1 $2 $3";
       break;

      case 9 :
         phoneParser = new Regex(@"(\d{4})(\d{3})(\d{2})(\d{2})");
         format      = "$1 $2 $3 $4";
       break;

      case 10 :
         phoneParser = new Regex(@"(\d{3})(\d{3})(\d{2})(\d{2})");
         format      = "$1 $2 $3 $4";
       break;

      case 11 :
         phoneParser = new Regex(@"(\d{4})(\d{3})(\d{2})(\d{2})");
         format      = "$1 $2 $3 $4";
       break;

      default:
        return phoneNumber;

   }//switch

   return phoneParser.Replace( phoneNumber, format );

}//FormatPhoneNumber

    enter code here
share|improve this answer
    
input: 1234567890 output: 123 456 78 90 does not work – MC9000 Jun 11 '15 at 1:19
Function FormatPhoneNumber(ByVal myNumber As String)
    Dim mynewNumber As String
    mynewNumber = ""
    myNumber = myNumber.Replace("(", "").Replace(")", "").Replace("-", "")
    If myNumber.Length < 10 Then
        mynewNumber = myNumber
    ElseIf myNumber.Length = 10 Then
        mynewNumber = "(" & myNumber.Substring(0, 3) & ") " &
                myNumber.Substring(3, 3) & "-" & myNumber.Substring(6, 3)
    ElseIf myNumber.Length > 10 Then
        mynewNumber = "(" & myNumber.Substring(0, 3) & ") " &
                myNumber.Substring(3, 3) & "-" & myNumber.Substring(6, 3) & " " &
                myNumber.Substring(10)
    End If
    Return mynewNumber
End Function
share|improve this answer
    
Voted up but... This is a vb.net answer and the question is c# – Justin Kirk Oct 24 '12 at 12:23
    
input: 1234567890 output: (123) 456-789 Does not work! – MC9000 Jun 11 '15 at 1:20

Use Match in Regex to split, then output formatted string with match.groups

Regex regex = new Regex(@"(?<first3chr>\d{3})(?<next3chr>\d{3})(?<next4chr>\d{4})");
Match match = regex.Match(phone);
if (match.Success) return "(" + match.Groups["first3chr"].ToString() + ")" + " " + 
  match.Groups["next3chr"].ToString() + "-" + match.Groups["next4chr"].ToString();
share|improve this answer

Try this

string result;
if ( (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(phoneNumber)) && (phoneNumber.Length >= 10 ) )
    result = string.Format("{0:(###)###-"+new string('#',phoneNumber.Length-6)+"}",
    Convert.ToInt64(phoneNumber)
    );
else
    result = phoneNumber;
return result;

Cheers.

share|improve this answer
public string phoneformat(string phnumber)
{
String phone=phnumber;
string countrycode = phone.Substring(0, 3); 
string Areacode = phone.Substring(3, 3); 
string number = phone.Substring(6,phone.Length); 

phnumber="("+countrycode+")" +Areacode+"-" +number ;

return phnumber;
}

Output will be :001-568-895623

share|improve this answer

To take care of your extension issue, how about:

string formatString = "###-###-#### ####";
returnValue = Convert.ToInt64(phoneNumber)
                     .ToString(formatString.Substring(0,phoneNumber.Length+3))
                     .Trim();
share|improve this answer

Not to resurrect an old question but figured I might offer at least a slightly easier to use method, if a little more complicated of a setup.

So if we create a new custom formatter we can use the simpler formatting of string.Format without having to convert our phone number to a long

So first lets create the custom formatter:

using System;
using System.Globalization;
using System.Text;

namespace System
{
    /// <summary>
    ///     A formatter that will apply a format to a string of numeric values.
    /// </summary>
    /// <example>
    ///     The following example converts a string of numbers and inserts dashes between them.
    ///     <code>
    /// public class Example
    /// {
    ///      public static void Main()
    ///      {          
    ///          string stringValue = "123456789";
    ///  
    ///          Console.WriteLine(String.Format(new NumericStringFormatter(),
    ///                                          "{0} (formatted: {0:###-##-####})",stringValue));
    ///      }
    ///  }
    ///  //  The example displays the following output:
    ///  //      123456789 (formatted: 123-45-6789)
    ///  </code>
    /// </example>
    public class NumericStringFormatter : IFormatProvider, ICustomFormatter
    {
        /// <summary>
        ///     Converts the value of a specified object to an equivalent string representation using specified format and
        ///     culture-specific formatting information.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="format">A format string containing formatting specifications.</param>
        /// <param name="arg">An object to format.</param>
        /// <param name="formatProvider">An object that supplies format information about the current instance.</param>
        /// <returns>
        ///     The string representation of the value of <paramref name="arg" />, formatted as specified by
        ///     <paramref name="format" /> and <paramref name="formatProvider" />.
        /// </returns>
        /// <exception cref="System.NotImplementedException"></exception>
        public string Format(string format, object arg, IFormatProvider formatProvider)
        {
            var strArg = arg as string;

            //  If the arg is not a string then determine if it can be handled by another formatter
            if (strArg == null)
            {
                try
                {
                    return HandleOtherFormats(format, arg);
                }
                catch (FormatException e)
                {
                    throw new FormatException(string.Format("The format of '{0}' is invalid.", format), e);
                }
            }

            // If the format is not set then determine if it can be handled by another formatter
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(format))
            {
                try
                {
                    return HandleOtherFormats(format, arg);
                }
                catch (FormatException e)
                {
                    throw new FormatException(string.Format("The format of '{0}' is invalid.", format), e);
                }
            }
            var sb = new StringBuilder();
            var i = 0;

            foreach (var c in format)
            {
                if (c == '#')
                {
                    if (i < strArg.Length)
                    {
                        sb.Append(strArg[i]);
                    }
                    i++;
                }
                else
                {
                    sb.Append(c);
                }
            }

            return sb.ToString();
        }

        /// <summary>
        ///     Returns an object that provides formatting services for the specified type.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="formatType">An object that specifies the type of format object to return.</param>
        /// <returns>
        ///     An instance of the object specified by <paramref name="formatType" />, if the
        ///     <see cref="T:System.IFormatProvider" /> implementation can supply that type of object; otherwise, null.
        /// </returns>
        public object GetFormat(Type formatType)
        {
            // Determine whether custom formatting object is requested. 
            return formatType == typeof(ICustomFormatter) ? this : null;
        }

        private string HandleOtherFormats(string format, object arg)
        {
            if (arg is IFormattable)
                return ((IFormattable)arg).ToString(format, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture);
            else if (arg != null)
                return arg.ToString();
            else
                return string.Empty;
        }
    }
}

So then if you want to use this you would do something this:

String.Format(new NumericStringFormatter(),"{0:###-###-####}", i["MyPhone"].ToString());

Some other things to think about:

Right now if you specified a longer formatter than you did a string to format it will just ignore the additional # signs. For example this String.Format(new NumericStringFormatter(),"{0:###-###-####}", "12345"); would result in 123-45- so you might want to have it take some kind of possible filler character in the constructor.

Also I didn't provide a way to escape a # sign so if you wanted to include that in your output string you wouldn't be able to the way it is right now.

The reason I prefer this method over Regex is I often have requirements to allow users to specify the format themselves and it is considerably easier for me to explain how to use this format than trying to teach a user regex.

Also the class name is a bit of misnomer since it actually works to format any string as long as you want to keep it in the same order and just inject characters inside of it.

share|improve this answer

The following will work with out use of regular expression

string primaryContactNumber = !string.IsNullOrEmpty(formData.Profile.Phone) ? String.Format("{0:###-###-####}", long.Parse(formData.Profile.Phone)) : "";

If we dont use long.Parse , the string.format will not work.

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