Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

For example

struct A
{
    static vector<int> s;
};

vector<int> A::s = {1, 2, 3};

However, my compiler doesn't support initialization list. Any way to implement it easily? Does lambda function help here?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Any way to implement it easily?

There's nothing particularly elegant. You can either copy the data from a static array, or initialise it with the result of a function call. The former might use more memory than you'd like, and the latter needs some slightly messy code.

Boost has a library to make that slightly less ugly:

#include <boost/assign/list_of.hpp>
vector<int> A::s = boost::assign::list_of(1)(2)(3);

Does lambda function help here?

Yes, it can save you from having to name a function just to initialise the vector:

vector<int> A::s = [] {
    vector<int> v;
    v.push_back(1);
    v.push_back(2); 
    v.push_back(3);
    return v;
}();

(Strictly speaking, this should have an explicit return type, []()->vector<int>, since the lambda body contains more than just a return statement. Some compilers will accept my version, and I believe it will become standard in 2014.)

share|improve this answer
    
boost::list_of is wonderful. But I have to use boost::assign::list_of to let it work. And in fact my vector is vector<unique<int>> Is the following has no memory leak? vector<unique_ptr<int>> A::s = boost::assign::list_of(new int(2)); –  user1899020 Sep 17 '13 at 15:45
    
@user1899020: Sorry, I forgot the assign part; I haven't used that library since brace-initialisation came along. –  Mike Seymour Sep 17 '13 at 15:46
1  
@user1899020: The unique_ptr initialisation should be fine as long as it compiles and none of the allocations fail. Since this is initialising a static object, failure will end the program, so there's no particular need to worry about leaks. More generally, you should use a make_unique function to immediately wrap each naked pointer before anything might throw. There should be a std::make_unique in C++14. –  Mike Seymour Sep 17 '13 at 15:49

I always fear being shot down for initialization ordering here for questions like this, but..

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <iterator>

struct A
{
    static std::vector<int> s;
};

static const int s_data[] = { 1,2,3 };
std::vector<int> A::s(std::begin(s_data), std::end(s_data));

int main()
{
    std::copy(A::s.begin(), A::s.end(), 
              std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
    return 0;
}

Output

1 2 3

Just because you can doesn't mean you should =P

Winning the award for the least efficient way to do this:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <cstdlib>
using namespace std;

template<typename T>
std::vector<T> v_init(const T& t)
{
    return std::vector<T>(1,t);
}

template<typename T, typename... Args>
std::vector<T> v_init(T&& t, Args&&... args)
{
    const T values[] = { t, args... };
    std::vector<T> v1(std::begin(values), std::end(values));
    return v1;
}

struct A
{
    static std::vector<int> s;
};

std::vector<int> A::s(v_init(1,2,3,4,5));


int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
    std::copy(A::s.begin(), A::s.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
    return 0;
}

Output

1 2 3 4 5 

This should puke at compile-time if T and anything in Args... is not type-compliant or type-castable. Of course, if you have variadic templates odds are you also have initializer lists, but it makes for fun brain-food if nothing else.

share|improve this answer

Write a simple init function for the vector:

vector<int> init()
{
  vector<int> v;
  v.reserve(3);
  v.push_back(1);
  v.push_back(2);
  v.push_back(3);
  return v;
};

vector<int> A::s = init();
share|improve this answer
    
This has undefined behavior all over the place (not to mention that it won't compile). –  James Kanze Sep 17 '13 at 16:13
    
@James it seems I forgot two lines of code. Fixed. And optimized. –  rubenvb Sep 17 '13 at 17:21
    
OK. Not the simplest nor the most optimal, but acceptable. (The simplest is to just define a static C style array, and use begin and end on it as arguments to the two iterator constructor of vector.) –  James Kanze Sep 17 '13 at 18:20
    
@James both solutions copy elements into a runtime allocated vector. Not much we can do about that without a constexpr'ed initializer_list constructor... –  rubenvb Sep 18 '13 at 8:08

You can initialize an std::vector from two pointers

int xv[] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};
std::vector<int> x(xv, xv+(sizeof(xv)/sizeof(xv[0])));

You can even factor this out in a template function:

template<typename T, int n>
std::vector<T> from_array(T (&v)[n]) {
    return std::vector<T>(v, v+n);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Formally, your initialization expression has undefined behavior. &xv[sizeof(xv)/sizeof(xv[0])] is an out of bounds access. Practically, it will probably work. But why all the complexity: std::vector<int> x( std::begin( xv ), std::end( xv ) );. (Of course, you don't have C++11, because otherwise, you'd use a new style initializer. So in fact, you'll have to use the equivalents of std::begin` and std::end from your toolkit.) –  James Kanze Sep 17 '13 at 16:17
    
@Kanze: No. For statically allocated arrays it's permitted to take the address of the past-last-element (you cannot dereference the address, but I'm not doing that). There is (was) what I think is a "bug" in the specs because this is not guaranteed for dynamically allocated arrays and (new int[10])+10 is indeed formally UB. In my case it's valid code however. –  6502 Sep 17 '13 at 16:29
    
And what does xv[sizeof(xv)/sizeof(xv[0])] do? It dereferences the one past the end pointer. (It is the exact equivalent, by definition, of *(xv + sizeof(xv)/sizeof(xv[0])).) –  James Kanze Sep 17 '13 at 17:08
    
@Kanze: No again. The expression is not xv[sizeof...] but &xv[sizeof...]. If p is a pointer the expression &*p is NOT dereferencing the pointer. For a description of why int x[10]; &x[10]; is legal see stackoverflow.com/a/988220/320726 (includes citations from the standard). –  6502 Sep 17 '13 at 17:50
    
The expression xv[sizeof...] has undefined behavior. What you do after the undefined behavior is irrelevant. C has a special rule to allow this; the C++ committee considered adding the special rule to C++, and decided not to. The answer you quote is wrong. –  James Kanze Sep 17 '13 at 18:18

Another idea:

struct A
{
  static std::vector<int> s;
};

std::vector<int> A::s;

static bool dummy((A::s.push_back(1), A::s.push_back(2), A::s.push_back(3), false));
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.